Claudia Rankine with Saskia Hamilton, Conversation, 6 May 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 6, 2015.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including, most recently, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf, 2014) which continues Rankine’s unique genre and presents a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism on society. Another collection, Don’t Let Me Be Lonely (Graywolf, 2004), is a multi-genre experimental project, blending poetry, essays, and images, of which she writes, “Forgiveness, I finally decide, is not the death of amnesia, nor is it a form of madness as Derrida claims. For the one who forgives, it is simply a death, a dying down in the heart, the position of the already dead.” In praise, Jorie Graham wrote, “Rankine breaks out of virtual emotion, reawakens honesty, and exhibits such raw political courage and aesthetic bravery it sends tremors through the entire field of American poetry as she finds it.”

Her plays include Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue, which was commissioned by the Foundry Theatre, and Existing Conditions (co-authored with Casey Llewellyn).

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Saskia Hamilton. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Claudia Rankine with Saskia Hamilton, Reading, 6 May 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 6, 2015.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including, most recently, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf, 2014) which continues Rankine’s unique genre and presents a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism on society. Another collection, Don’t Let Me Be Lonely (Graywolf, 2004), is a multi-genre experimental project, blending poetry, essays, and images, of which she writes, “Forgiveness, I finally decide, is not the death of amnesia, nor is it a form of madness as Derrida claims. For the one who forgives, it is simply a death, a dying down in the heart, the position of the already dead.” In praise, Jorie Graham wrote, “Rankine breaks out of virtual emotion, reawakens honesty, and exhibits such raw political courage and aesthetic bravery it sends tremors through the entire field of American poetry as she finds it.”

Her plays include Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue, which was commissioned by the Foundry Theatre, and Existing Conditions (co-authored with Casey Llewellyn).

In this episode she is introduced by Saskia Hamilton and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Claudia Rankine with Saskia Hamilton, 6 May 2015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 6, 2015.

Claudia Rankine with Saskia Hamilton

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including, most recently, Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf, 2014) which continues Rankine’s unique genre and presents a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism on society. Another collection, Don’t Let Me Be Lonely (Graywolf, 2004), is a multi-genre experimental project, blending poetry, essays, and images, of which she writes, “Forgiveness, I finally decide, is not the death of amnesia, nor is it a form of madness as Derrida claims. For the one who forgives, it is simply a death, a dying down in the heart, the position of the already dead.” In praise, Jorie Graham wrote, “Rankine breaks out of virtual emotion, reawakens honesty, and exhibits such raw political courage and aesthetic bravery it sends tremors through the entire field of American poetry as she finds it.”

Her plays include Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue, which was commissioned by the Foundry Theatre, and Existing Conditions (co-authored with Casey Llewellyn).

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Naomi Klein with Katharine Viner, Conversation, 29 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 29, 2015.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, fellow at The Nation Institute, and author of the international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Her regular column for The Nation and The Guardian is distributed internationally by The New York Times Syndicate. In 2004 Klein won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for her reporting from Iraq for Harper’s Magazine. The same year, she released The Take, a feature documentary about Argentina’s occupied factories, co-produced with Avi Lewis.

Her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, to be published in September, examines why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Katharine Viner. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Naomi Klein with Katharine Viner, Talk, 29 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 29, 2015.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, fellow at The Nation Institute, and author of the international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Her regular column for The Nation and The Guardian is distributed internationally by The New York Times Syndicate. In 2004 Klein won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for her reporting from Iraq for Harper’s Magazine. The same year, she released The Take, a feature documentary about Argentina’s occupied factories, co-produced with Avi Lewis.

Her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, to be published in September, examines why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In this episode she is introduced by Katharine Viner and then gives a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Naomi Klein with Katharine Viner, 29 April 2 015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 29, 2015.

Naomi Klein with Katharine Viner

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, fellow at The Nation Institute, and author of the international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Her regular column for The Nation and The Guardian is distributed internationally by The New York Times Syndicate. In 2004 Klein won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for her reporting from Iraq for Harper’s Magazine. The same year, she released The Take, a feature documentary about Argentina’s occupied factories, co-produced with Avi Lewis.

Her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, to be published in September, examines why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 15 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 15 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then read from his work along with Deborah Eisenberg. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, 15 April 2015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris, Conversation, 8 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 8, 2015.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, writer, journalist, and educator, is also a senior editor for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. His recent piece titled The Case for Reparations intricately and provocatively traces the history of racism in the United States from slavery to recent examples of housing discrimination. The much-lauded piece set a single-day traffic record for a magazine article on The Atlantic’s web site, and the attention it has garnered has given Coates a greater forum to wrestle with questions of identity — both blackness and whiteness. The event was followed by a talk with Michele Norris.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, writer, journalist, and educator is a senior editor for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is also a former writer for The Village Voice and a contributor to Time, O, and The New York Times Magazine. He has contributed to The New York Times and The Washington Post and has appeared on Democracy Now! and Moyers & Company.

In 2008 he published a memoir, The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood. His recent piece published in The Atlantic, titled The Case for Reparations intricately and provocatively traces the history of racism in the United States from slavery to recent examples of housing discrimination. The much-lauded piece set a single-day traffic record for a magazine article on The Atlantic’s web site, and the attention it has garnered has given Coates a greater forum to wrestle with questions of identity — both blackness and whiteness.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michele Norris. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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