Category Archives: Fiction

George Saunders with Joel Lovell, Reading, 12 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 12, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

George Saunders has written, “The land of the short story, is a brutal land, a land very similar, in its strictness, to the land of the joke.” His story collections, including CivilWarLand in Bad Decline and Pastoralia, feature characters who speak in a strangely futuristic language, often abbreviated, part sales pitch, part self-help, and are found in environs like twisted amusement parks and ridiculous theme restaurants. Saunders’ unflappable humanity for his characters, the haves and the have-nots, no matter how wretched they may be, leaves the reader hopeful. He said, “I think our brains basically came off the same assembly line, and that this is maybe one of the ways that fiction does what it does, even though we are all different people, different genders, with different backgrounds.” Saunders’ most recent story collection is Tenth of December.

In this episode he is introduced by Joel Lovell and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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George Saunders with Joel Lovell, 12 February 2014 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 12, 2014.

George Saunders with Joel Lovell

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

George Saunders has written, “The land of the short story, is a brutal land, a land very similar, in its strictness, to the land of the joke.” His story collections, including CivilWarLand in Bad Decline and Pastoralia, feature characters who speak in a strangely futuristic language, often abbreviated, part sales pitch, part self-help, and are found in environs like twisted amusement parks and ridiculous theme restaurants. Saunders’ unflappable humanity for his characters, the haves and the have-nots, no matter how wretched they may be, leaves the reader hopeful. He said, “I think our brains basically came off the same assembly line, and that this is maybe one of the ways that fiction does what it does, even though we are all different people, different genders, with different backgrounds.” Saunders’ most recent story collection is Tenth of December.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Luis Alberto Urrea with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 20 November 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 20, 2013.

Luis Alberto Urrea’s native Mexico has always served as the author’s muse, inspiring all 13 books that span five genres. His nonfiction The Devil’s Highway tells the harrowing story of a group of Mexican immigrants lost in the Arizona desert. Urrea’s novels The Hummingbird’s Daughter and its sequel,Queen of America, chronicle the life of beloved healer Teresita Urrea, deemed “the Mexican Joan of Arc.” Born in Tijuana to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urrea grew up along both sides of the border, forever affected by its dichotomy, brutality and richness, saying, “Borders everywhere are a symbol of what divides us. That’s what interests me.”

This was a Lannan Literary Event.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Luis Alberto Urrea with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 20 November 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 20, 2013.

Luis Alberto Urrea’s native Mexico has always served as the author’s muse, inspiring all 13 books that span five genres. His nonfiction The Devil’s Highway tells the harrowing story of a group of Mexican immigrants lost in the Arizona desert. Urrea’s novels The Hummingbird’s Daughter and its sequel,Queen of America, chronicle the life of beloved healer Teresita Urrea, deemed “the Mexican Joan of Arc.” Born in Tijuana to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urrea grew up along both sides of the border, forever affected by its dichotomy, brutality and richness, saying, “Borders everywhere are a symbol of what divides us. That’s what interests me.”

This was a Lannan Literary Event.

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Luis Alberto Urrea with Michael Silverblatt, 20 November 2013 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 20, 2013.

Luis Alberto Urrea with Michael Silverblatt

Luis Alberto Urrea’s native Mexico has always served as the author’s muse, inspiring all 13 books that span five genres. His nonfiction The Devil’s Highway tells the harrowing story of a group of Mexican immigrants lost in the Arizona desert. Urrea’s novels The Hummingbird’s Daughter and its sequel,Queen of America, chronicle the life of beloved healer Teresita Urrea, deemed “the Mexican Joan of Arc.” Born in Tijuana to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urrea grew up along both sides of the border, forever affected by its dichotomy, brutality and richness, saying, “Borders everywhere are a symbol of what divides us. That’s what interests me.”

This was a Lannan Literary Event.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Jamaica Kincaid with Robert Faggen, Reading, 16 October 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 16, 2013.

Jamaica Kincaid, whose work has been called loosely auto-biographical, has said, “Everything I say is true, and everything I say is not true. You couldn’t admit any of it to a court of law. It would not be good evidence.” Her recent novel, See Now Then, chronicles the death of a marriage like a beautiful elegy, where Mr. and Mrs. Sweet’s final years together are anything but. Kincaid immigrated from the West Indies at 17 to New York, where she eventually joined the staff of The New Yorker.

Her books explore themes of colonialism and its legacy, and the complex relationships between mothers and daughters. She is the author of 19 books including the novel The Autobiography of My Mother and the memoir Among Flowers, chronicling her journey deep into the mountains of Nepal.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode she is introduced by Robert Faggen and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Jamaica Kincaid with Robert Faggen, Conversation, 16 October 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 16, 2013.

Jamaica Kincaid, whose work has been called loosely auto-biographical, has said, “Everything I say is true, and everything I say is not true. You couldn’t admit any of it to a court of law. It would not be good evidence.” Her recent novel, See Now Then, chronicles the death of a marriage like a beautiful elegy, where Mr. and Mrs. Sweet’s final years together are anything but. Kincaid immigrated from the West Indies at 17 to New York, where she eventually joined the staff of The New Yorker.

Her books explore themes of colonialism and its legacy, and the complex relationships between mothers and daughters. She is the author of 19 books including the novel The Autobiography of My Mother and the memoir Among Flowers, chronicling her journey deep into the mountains of Nepal.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode she is introduced by Robert Faggen and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Jamaica Kincaid with Robert Faggen, 16 October 2013 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 16, 2013.

Jamaica Kincaid with Robert Faggen

Jamaica Kincaid, whose work has been called loosely auto-biographical, has said, “Everything I say is true, and everything I say is not true. You couldn’t admit any of it to a court of law. It would not be good evidence.” Her recent novel, See Now Then, chronicles the death of a marriage like a beautiful elegy, where Mr. and Mrs. Sweet’s final years together are anything but. Kincaid immigrated from the West Indies at 17 to New York, where she eventually joined the staff of The New Yorker.

Her books explore themes of colonialism and its legacy, and the complex relationships between mothers and daughters. She is the author of 19 books including the novel The Autobiography of My Mother and the memoir Among Flowers, chronicling her journey deep into the mountains of Nepal.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

James Heffernan on Leopold Bloom, 16 June 2013 – Audio

Recorded at the New Mexico History Museum Auditorium in Santa Fe, New Mexico on June 16, 2013.

James Heffernan on Leopold Bloom

A Lecture in Celebration of Bloomsday Presented by James Heffernan. Bloomsday is a commemoration and celebration of the life of the Irish writer James Joyce during which the events of his novel Ulysses (which is set on 16 June 1904) are relived. It is observed annually on 16 June in Dublin and many cities around the world. Professor Heffernan will give an in-depth talk on Leopold Bloom, the hero of James Joyce’s celebrated novel Ulysses, to commemorate Bloomsday in Santa Fe.

James Heffernan, Professor Emeritus from Dartmouth College, has written extensively on James Joyce, particularly his Ulysses. For the Teaching Company he has taped 24 lectures on Ulysses and another 24 on great authors from Wordsworth to Camus. His addiction to political news periodically drives him to blog for The Huffington Post where he advocated Stephen Colbert for Pope in January and again in February 2013.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view video recording of this event there.

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James Heffernan, Conversation, 16 June 2013 – Video

Recorded at the New Mexico History Museum Auditorium in Santa Fe, New Mexico on June 16, 2013.

A Lecture in Celebration of Bloomsday Presented by James Heffernan. Bloomsday is a commemoration and celebration of the life of the Irish writer James Joyce during which the events of his novel Ulysses (which is set on 16 June 1904) are relived. It is observed annually on 16 June in Dublin and many cities around the world. Professor Heffernan will give an in-depth talk on Leopold Bloom, the hero of James Joyce’s celebrated novel Ulysses, to commemorate Bloomsday in Santa Fe.

James Heffernan, Professor Emeritus from Dartmouth College, has written extensively on James Joyce, particularly his Ulysses. For the Teaching Company he has taped 24 lectures on Ulysses and another 24 on great authors from Wordsworth to Camus. His addiction to political news periodically drives him to blog for The Huffington Post where he advocated Stephen Colbert for Pope in January and again in February 2013.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with the audience. The companion Talk may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts: