Nadeem Aslam with Phil Klay, Reading, 30 March 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 30, 2016.

This was a Lannan Literary event.

Nadeem Aslam is a British-Pakistani novelist whose works include Maps for Lost Lovers, The Wasted Vigil, and The Blind Man’s Garden, a tale of two brothers whose lives are upended by war post 9/11. Explaining that his fiction is inspired by “anything that distresses me,” Aslam’s The Wasted Vigil was fed by his conversations with more than 200 Afghan refugees in Britain as well as his travels in Afghanistan.

Aslam’s 2004 novel, Maps for Lost Lovers, tells the story of migrants from Pakistan who live in a cold and unwelcoming English town they have renamed Dasht-e-Tanhaii, meaning the Desert of Loneliness. Marred by racism and violence, Aslam has explained it is not unlike the Northern English town he moved to at the age of 14 where, “we were experiencing low-level September 11s every day.” Through his family, “I learned about political commitment and the life of the mind, and that an artist is never poor.” Nadeem Aslam is the recipient of the Kiriyama Prize, awarded for books about the Pacific Rim and South Asia, as well as a 2005 Lannan Literary Fellowship for Fiction.

In this episode, he is introduced by Phil Klay and then read from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Nadeem Aslam with Phil Klay, 30 March 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 30, 2016.

Nadeem Aslam with Phil Klay, 30 March 2016

This was a Lannan Literary event.

Nadeem Aslam is a British-Pakistani novelist whose works include Maps for Lost Lovers, The Wasted Vigil, and The Blind Man’s Garden, a tale of two brothers whose lives are upended by war post 9/11. Explaining that his fiction is inspired by “anything that distresses me,” Aslam’s The Wasted Vigil was fed by his conversations with more than 200 Afghan refugees in Britain as well as his travels in Afghanistan.

Aslam’s 2004 novel, Maps for Lost Lovers, tells the story of migrants from Pakistan who live in a cold and unwelcoming English town they have renamed Dasht-e-Tanhaii, meaning the Desert of Loneliness. Marred by racism and violence, Aslam has explained it is not unlike the Northern English town he moved to at the age of 14 where, “we were experiencing low-level September 11s every day.” Through his family, “I learned about political commitment and the life of the mind, and that an artist is never poor.” Nadeem Aslam is the recipient of the Kiriyama Prize, awarded for books about the Pacific Rim and South Asia, as well as a 2005 Lannan Literary Fellowship for Fiction.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Gabrielle Walker with Chris Williams, Conversation, 23 March 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 23, 2016.

Gabrielle Walker is an expert on climate change and the energy industry. She holds a Ph.D. in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University and has taught at Cambridge and Princeton Universities. She is the author of four books, most recently, Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of a Mysterious Continent and the best-selling The Hot Topic: What We Can Do About Global Warming (co-written with David King).

She is currently Chief Scientist at Xynteo, an advisory firm that seeks to enable businesses to grow in a manner which is responsive to the resource, climate, and demographic challenges of the 21st century.

In this event, Walker talked about climate change, action, and sustainability.
This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation with Chris Williams. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Gabrielle Walker with Chris Williams, Talk, 23 March 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 23, 2016.

Gabrielle Walker is an expert on climate change and the energy industry. She holds a Ph.D. in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University and has taught at Cambridge and Princeton Universities. She is the author of four books, most recently, Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of a Mysterious Continent and the best-selling The Hot Topic: What We Can Do About Global Warming (co-written with David King).

She is currently Chief Scientist at Xynteo, an advisory firm that seeks to enable businesses to grow in a manner which is responsive to the resource, climate, and demographic challenges of the 21st century.

In this event, Walker talked about climate change, action, and sustainability.
This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is introduced by Chris Williams and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Gabrielle Walker with Chris Williams, 23 March 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 23, 2016.

photo of Gabrielle Walker with Chris Williams 23 March 2016

Gabrielle Walker is an expert on climate change and the energy industry. She holds a Ph.D. in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University and has taught at Cambridge and Princeton Universities. She is the author of four books, most recently, Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of a Mysterious Continent and the best-selling The Hot Topic: What We Can Do About Global Warming (co-written with David King).

She is currently Chief Scientist at Xynteo, an advisory firm that seeks to enable businesses to grow in a manner which is responsive to the resource, climate, and demographic challenges of the 21st century.

In this event, Walker talked about climate change, action, and sustainability.
This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, Conversation, 24 February 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she joins in conversation with Mililani Trask. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, Talk, 24 February 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is introduced by Mililani Trask and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, 24 February 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, 24 February 2016

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Anthony Ray Hinton with Ben Harmon, 10 January 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lannan Foundation in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 10, 2016.

This was a special Lannan Cultural Freedom event.

At the age of 29, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama and charged with two capital murders based on flimsy and faulty firearms evidence. Despite having no criminal background, a confirmed alibi, and successfully passing a polygraph test, he was convicted and sentenced to death. Throughout 30 years in jail and on death row, he not only maintained his innocence but persisted in trying to have his case overturned. Finally, in April 2015 with the support of the Equal Justice Initiative, he was fully exonerated and set free.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Anthony Ray Hinton with Ben Harmon, 10 January 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lannan Foundation in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 10, 2016.

Anthony Ray Hinton with Ben Harmon, 10 January 2016

This was a special Lannan Cultural Freedom event.

At the age of 29, Anthony Ray Hinton was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama and charged with two capital murders based on flimsy and faulty firearms evidence. Despite having no criminal background, a confirmed alibi, and successfully passing a polygraph test, he was convicted and sentenced to death. Throughout 30 years in jail and on death row, he not only maintained his innocence but persisted in trying to have his case overturned. Finally, in April 2015 with the support of the Equal Justice Initiative, he was fully exonerated and set free.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recording of this event there.

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