Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis, Talk, 26 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 26, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series.

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University and is the author of several books on Latin America, including A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War; Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism; and Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Grandin has published extensively on issues of revolution, popular memory, U.S.-Latin American relations, photography, genocide, truth commissions, human rights, disease, and political violence. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World.

In this episode he is introduced by Avi Lewis and then talks. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis, Conversation, 26 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 26, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series.

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University and is the author of several books on Latin America, including A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War; Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism; and Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Grandin has published extensively on issues of revolution, popular memory, U.S.-Latin American relations, photography, genocide, truth commissions, human rights, disease, and political violence. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Avi Lewis. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis, 26 February 2014 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 26, 2014.

Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University, where he teaches U.S. foreign policy in Latin America. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World. The talk was followed by a conversation with Avi Lewis.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series.

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University and is the author of several books on Latin America, including A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War; Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism; and Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Grandin has published extensively on issues of revolution, popular memory, U.S.-Latin American relations, photography, genocide, truth commissions, human rights, disease, and political violence. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Going On by Peter Reading – Audio

Going On, Peter Reading, 1985
Publisher: Bloodaxe (included in Collected Poems 2: Poems 1985-1996)

Graphic for Peter Reading, Going On

“What he [Peter Reading] uniquely had was an obsessive craftsmanship, at ease with every kind of verse-form, matched with a macabre, bizarre sense of humour. He relished the stately and the ceremonial, as much as he kept his ears open for the demotic, the inarticulate, the speechless.” — Anthony Thwaite, The Independent, December 2011

Portions of this podcast are explicit and may contain adult language.

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You may learn more about Peter Reading on the Lannan website.

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George Saunders with Joel Lovell, Conversation, 12 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 12, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

George Saunders has written, “The land of the short story, is a brutal land, a land very similar, in its strictness, to the land of the joke.” His story collections, including CivilWarLand in Bad Decline and Pastoralia, feature characters who speak in a strangely futuristic language, often abbreviated, part sales pitch, part self-help, and are found in environs like twisted amusement parks and ridiculous theme restaurants. Saunders’ unflappable humanity for his characters, the haves and the have-nots, no matter how wretched they may be, leaves the reader hopeful. He said, “I think our brains basically came off the same assembly line, and that this is maybe one of the ways that fiction does what it does, even though we are all different people, different genders, with different backgrounds.” Saunders’ most recent story collection is Tenth of December.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Joel Lovell. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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George Saunders with Joel Lovell, Reading, 12 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 12, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

George Saunders has written, “The land of the short story, is a brutal land, a land very similar, in its strictness, to the land of the joke.” His story collections, including CivilWarLand in Bad Decline and Pastoralia, feature characters who speak in a strangely futuristic language, often abbreviated, part sales pitch, part self-help, and are found in environs like twisted amusement parks and ridiculous theme restaurants. Saunders’ unflappable humanity for his characters, the haves and the have-nots, no matter how wretched they may be, leaves the reader hopeful. He said, “I think our brains basically came off the same assembly line, and that this is maybe one of the ways that fiction does what it does, even though we are all different people, different genders, with different backgrounds.” Saunders’ most recent story collection is Tenth of December.

In this episode he is introduced by Joel Lovell and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

George Saunders with Joel Lovell, 12 February 2014 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 12, 2014.

George Saunders with Joel Lovell

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

George Saunders has written, “The land of the short story, is a brutal land, a land very similar, in its strictness, to the land of the joke.” His story collections, including CivilWarLand in Bad Decline and Pastoralia, feature characters who speak in a strangely futuristic language, often abbreviated, part sales pitch, part self-help, and are found in environs like twisted amusement parks and ridiculous theme restaurants. Saunders’ unflappable humanity for his characters, the haves and the have-nots, no matter how wretched they may be, leaves the reader hopeful. He said, “I think our brains basically came off the same assembly line, and that this is maybe one of the ways that fiction does what it does, even though we are all different people, different genders, with different backgrounds.” Saunders’ most recent story collection is Tenth of December.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Ukulele Music by Peter Reading – Audio

Ukulele Music, Peter Reading, 1985
Publisher: Bloodaxe (included in Collected Poems 2: Poems 1985-1996)

graphic for Peter Reading, Ukulele Music

“Like a ventriloquist, in Ukelele Music, Reading intermittently assumes the voice of an obsequious charwoman named Viv, trying to cadge some money from her master, and at other times that of a chronicler of gruesome naval battles and mishaps. What the seemingly unrelated spheres have in common is the dire state of ‘H. sap.,’ or homo sapiens, examined in gruesome detail. His obsession with the gross has led British reviewers to call Reading’s humor ‘too black’–a criticism ushered into his poems, along with a reply: ‘What do they think they’re playing at, then, these Poetry Wallahs?’ The poet proclaims that, ‘this is the Age Of The Greatly Bewildered Granny & Grandad, / shitlessly scared by the bad, mindless and jobless and young.’” –Publisher’s Weekly, August 1994

Portions of this podcast are explicit and may contain adult language.

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You may learn more about Peter Reading on the Lannan website.

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Vendange Tardive by Peter Reading – Audio

Vendange Tardive, Peter Reading, 2010
Publisher: Bloodaxe Books

graphic for Peter Reading, Vendange Tardive

Vendange Tardive is a late harvest of vintage Reading in disaster mode. Here is a rueful crop of valedictory poems in which man reaps what he sows: shipwreck, ruin, death, war, ignomony and extinction. But somehow, amid all that, there is still the fruit of the vine and the bittersweet spirit of life.” – Bloodaxe Books

“A vendange tardive is a late-harvest wine, and the title poem records the gift of a bottle on the poet’s 62nd birthday. Another poem, ‘All Is Safely Gathered In’, in which he offers thanks for a birthday bottle of champagne, bluntly begins: ‘Morituri te salutant’ (we who are about to die salute you). While this book marks Reading’s return to a collection of individual pieces, it still coheres as he weaves multiple threads in which deaths of family members and friends mix with the deleterious effects of oil-dependent economies, compounded by a day-to-day awareness that not only is the self at the age of ‘late harvest’, but in the face of climate change, so is the whole human race.” – Carrie Etter, The Guardian.

Portions of this podcast are explicit and may contain adult language.

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You may learn more about Peter Reading on the Lannan website. You may also watch a video of these poems being read by Peter Reading there as well.

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-273.15 by Peter Reading – Audio

-273.15, Peter Reading, 2005
Publisher: Bloodaxe Books

graphic for Peter Reading, -273.15

-273.15 [absolute zero] is a lament, a tirade, a disaster warning, and an anthropologist’s catalogue of our final expedition addressed to an earlier survivor of global catastrophe, Noah of the Flood.
“Despair, both environmental and political, is never absent; but this is an appreciative, defiantly humane volume.” – Robert Potts, The Guardian.

Portions of this podcast are explicit and may contain adult language.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about Peter Reading on the Lannan website. You may also watch a video of these poems being read by Peter Reading there as well.

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