Rev. William Barber II, Talk, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II was introduced by Khury Petersen-Smith, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Rev. William Barber II, Conversation, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II joined Khury Petersen-Smith in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II, 11 October 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Talk, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh was introduced by Jeremy Scahill, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Conversation, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh joined Jeremy Scahill in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, 26 September 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Clive Hamilton with Lisa Sideris, Talk, 2 May 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 2, 2018.

Clive Hamilton is an Australian author, public intellectual, and professor of public ethics at Charles Sturt University in Australia.

He received his PhD from the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom. He is the founder and former executive director of the Australia Institute, a progressive think tank. He has held visiting academic positions at Yale University, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, and Sciences Po in Paris.

Hamilton has published on a wide range of subjects. Among his early works are Growth Fetish, Affluenza (with Richard Denniss), and Silencing Dissent. His most recent books include The Freedom Paradox: Towards a Post-Secular Ethics, Requiem for a Species: Why We Resist the Truth about Climate Change, and the recently published Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Clive Hamilton was introduced by Lisa Sideris, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Clive Hamilton with Lisa Sideris, Conversation, 2 May 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 2, 2018.

Clive Hamilton is an Australian author, public intellectual, and professor of public ethics at Charles Sturt University in Australia.

He received his PhD from the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom. He is the founder and former executive director of the Australia Institute, a progressive think tank. He has held visiting academic positions at Yale University, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, and Sciences Po in Paris.

Hamilton has published on a wide range of subjects. Among his early works are Growth Fetish, Affluenza (with Richard Denniss), and Silencing Dissent. His most recent books include The Freedom Paradox: Towards a Post-Secular Ethics, Requiem for a Species: Why We Resist the Truth about Climate Change, and the recently published Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Clive Hamilton joined Lisa Sideris in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Clive Hamilton with Lisa Sideris, 2 May 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 2, 2018.

Clive Hamilton with Lisa Sideris

Clive Hamilton is an Australian author, public intellectual, and professor of public ethics at Charles Sturt University in Australia.

He received his PhD from the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom. He is the founder and former executive director of the Australia Institute, a progressive think tank. He has held visiting academic positions at Yale University, the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford, University College London, and Sciences Po in Paris.

Hamilton has published on a wide range of subjects. Among his early works are Growth Fetish, Affluenza (with Richard Denniss), and Silencing Dissent. His most recent books include The Freedom Paradox: Towards a Post-Secular Ethics, Requiem for a Species: Why We Resist the Truth about Climate Change, and the recently published Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Clive Hamilton talked about his work, then joined Lisa Sideris in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rachel Kushner with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 18 April 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2018.

Rachel Kushner’s first novel, Telex from Cuba, is set in Oriente, Cuba, in an expat community funded by the United Fruit Company and a nickel mine, during the years leading up to Castro’s revolution. Of the book, the New York Times wrote, “Out of tropical rot, Kushner has fashioned a story that will linger like a whiff of decadent Colony perfume.”

Her second novel, The Flamethrowers, is set mostly in the mid-1970s and follows the life of Reno, so named for her place of birth, a young artist who comes to New York intent on marrying her love of motorcycles, speed, and art. The title takes its name from weapons used by the Italian Arditi, a division of elite shock troops that operated during the First World War.

Kushner has twice been a finalist for the National Book Award and is a Guggenheim Fellow. Her fiction and essays appear regularly in the New York Times, the Paris Review, The Believer, Artforum, Bookforum, Fence, Bomb, and Grand Street.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rachel Kushner was introduced by Michael Silverblatt, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording / watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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