Author Archives: Lannan Foundation

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, 3 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Conversation, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy joined Anthony Arnove in conversation. The companion talk is found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Marlon James with Russell Banks, Conversation, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James joined Russell Banks in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, Reading, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, 10 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James with Russell Banks

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, read from his work, then joined Russell Banks in conversation.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Talk, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy was introduced by Anthony Arnove, then talked about her work. You will find the companion conversation online shortly.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, Conversation, 29 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen joined Maxine Hong Kingston in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, Reading, 29 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen was introduced by Maxine Hong Kingston, then read from his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, 29 March 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen, introduced by Maxine Hong Kingston, read from his work then joined Ms. Kingston in conversation.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the video recordings of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Terry Tempest Williams with Colum McCann, Conversation, 8 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 8, 2017.

Terry Tempest Williams is an award-winning author, environmentalist, and activist who writes about the intersection of environmental and social justice. A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she is known for her impassioned and lyrical prose. She is the author of the environmental literature classics, Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place; An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field; Desert Quartet; Leap; Red: Patience and Passion in the Desert; The Open Space of Democracy; and Finding Beauty in a Broken World. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Orion Magazine, and numerous anthologies worldwide as a crucial voice for ecological consciousness and social change.

Her newest book is The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, released this year to coincide with the centennial of the National Park Service.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Terry Tempest Williams joined Colum McCann in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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