Author Archives: Lannan Foundation

Masha Gessen with Anand Giridharadas – Surviving Autocracy 20 October 2020 – Video

Recorded on YouTube on 20 October 2020.

Masha Gessen is the author of eleven books and a staff writer for the New Yorker. In addition to Surviving Autocracy (2020), their recent books include The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia (2017), which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction; The Brothers: The Road to an American Tragedy (2015), about the Boston Marathon bombers; and The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (2012). They spoke with Anand Giridharadas, who is an editor-at-large for Time magazine, an on-air political analyst for MSNBC, and a visiting scholar at New York University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event. This event was in partnership with Haymarket Books.

Listen to the audio version here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Masha Gessen with Anand Giridharadas – Surviving Autocracy 20 October 2020 – Audio

Recorded on YouTube on 20 October 2020.

Masha Gessen with Anand Giridharadas - Surviving Autocracy 20 October 2020

Masha Gessen is the author of eleven books and a staff writer for the New Yorker. In addition to Surviving Autocracy (2020), their recent books include The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia (2017), which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction; The Brothers: The Road to an American Tragedy (2015), about the Boston Marathon bombers; and The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (2012). They spoke with Anand Giridharadas, who is an editor-at-large for Time magazine, an on-air political analyst for MSNBC, and a visiting scholar at New York University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event. This event was in partnership with Haymarket Books.

Duration: 1:20:11

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Yanis Varoufakis with Daniel Denvir 13 August 2020 – Audio

Recorded on YouTube on 13 August 2020.

Yanis Varoufakis is a member of Greece’s parliament and leader of the Greek political party MeRA25, which belongs to the pan-European movement DiEM25. He spoke with Daniel Denvir.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Yanis Varoufakis joined us from his home in Greece and discussed the global economy. He then engaged in conversation with Daniel Denvir, host of “The Dig” podcast from jacobin magazine. Co-presented by Haymarket Books.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Yanis Varoufakis with Daniel Denvir 13 August 2020 – Video

Recorded on YouTube on 13 August 2020.

Yanis Varoufakis is a member of Greece’s parliament and leader of the Greek political party MeRA25, which belongs to the pan-European movement DiEM25. He spoke with Daniel Denvir.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Yanis Varoufakis joined us from his home in Greece and discussed the global economy. He then engaged in conversation with Daniel Denvir, host of “The Dig” podcast from jacobin magazine. Co-presented by Haymarket Books.

Listen to the audio version here.
You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

James Heffernan: Stephen Dedalus, Leopold Bloom, and the Ghost of Shakespeare, 16 June 2020 – Video

Recorded by Mr. Heffernan remotely at his teaching office.

James Heffernan, Professor Emeritus of English at Dartmouth College, has lectured extensively on James Joyce, particularly Ulysses, which he has covered in 24 lectures for the Teaching Company. His many articles include a close study of Molly’s monologue, and his books include studies of English Romantic poetry and landscape painting, interart relations, “ekphrastic” poetry from Homer to John Ashbery, and—most recently– Hospitality and Treachery in Western Literature, published by Yale in 2014. He is now nearing completion of a book on politics and literature at the dawn of World War II.

Bloomsday is a commemoration and celebration of the life of the Irish writer James Joyce during which the events of his novel Ulysses (which is set on 16 June 1904) are relived. It is observed annually on 16 June in Dublin and many cities around the world.

Listen to the audio version here.
You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

James Heffernan: Stephen Dedalus, Leopold Bloom, and the Ghost of Shakespeare, 16 June 2020 – Audio

Recorded by Mr. Heffernan remotely at his teaching office.

photo of Professor James Heffernan in his office, talking about James Joyce for Bloomssday

James Heffernan, Professor Emeritus of English at Dartmouth College, has lectured extensively on James Joyce, particularly Ulysses, which he has covered in 24 lectures for the Teaching Company. His many articles include a close study of Molly’s monologue, and his books include studies of English Romantic poetry and landscape painting, interart relations, “ekphrastic” poetry from Homer to John Ashbery, and—most recently– Hospitality and Treachery in Western Literature, published by Yale in 2014. He is now nearing completion of a book on politics and literature at the dawn of World War II.

Bloomsday is a commemoration and celebration of the life of the Irish writer James Joyce during which the events of his novel Ulysses (which is set on 16 June 1904) are relived. It is observed annually on 16 June in Dublin and many cities around the world.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Talk, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—”hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh was introduced by Jeremy Scahill, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Conversation, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—”hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh joined Jeremy Scahill in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, 26 September 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—”hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Rachel Kushner with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 18 April 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2018.

Rachel Kushner’s first novel, Telex from Cuba, is set in Oriente, Cuba, in an expat community funded by the United Fruit Company and a nickel mine, during the years leading up to Castro’s revolution. Of the book, the New York Times wrote, “Out of tropical rot, Kushner has fashioned a story that will linger like a whiff of decadent Colony perfume.”

Her second novel, The Flamethrowers, is set mostly in the mid-1970s and follows the life of Reno, so named for her place of birth, a young artist who comes to New York intent on marrying her love of motorcycles, speed, and art. The title takes its name from weapons used by the Italian Arditi, a division of elite shock troops that operated during the First World War.

Kushner has twice been a finalist for the National Book Award and is a Guggenheim Fellow. Her fiction and essays appear regularly in the New York Times, the Paris Review, The Believer, Artforum, Bookforum, Fence, Bomb, and Grand Street.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rachel Kushner was introduced by Michael Silverblatt, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording / watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.