Category Archives: Fiction

Colum McCann with Gabriel Byrne, Conversation, 31 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 31, 2018.

Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories, including Let the Great World Spin, TransAtlantic, and Thirteen Ways of Looking. In a 2013 interview the author said, “I believe in the democracy of storytelling. That stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries. I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story or to listen to a story.”

McCann’s books cover a wide range of topics, including The Troubles in Northern Ireland, the life of Russian dancer Rudolf Nureyev, the first attempted nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1919, New York of the 1970s, and the tightrope walker who crossed the gap between the Twin Towers. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1965, McCann crossed the United States on a bicycle in the 1980s, describing the trip as being “simply to expand my lungs emotionally.”

He is the recipient of several honors, among them the National Book Award, the International DUBLIN Literary Award, and designation as a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres. In 2012 McCann cofounded the nonprofit global story-exchange organization Narrative 4, whose mission is to use storytelling to inspire “fearless hope through radical empathy.” McCann lives in New York with his family and teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Hunter College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Colum McCann joined Gabriel Byrne in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Colum McCann with Gabriel Byrne, 31 January 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 31, 2018.

Colum McCann with Gabriel Byrne

Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories, including Let the Great World Spin, TransAtlantic, and Thirteen Ways of Looking. In a 2013 interview the author said, “I believe in the democracy of storytelling. That stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries. I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story or to listen to a story.”

McCann’s books cover a wide range of topics, including The Troubles in Northern Ireland, the life of Russian dancer Rudolf Nureyev, the first attempted nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1919, New York of the 1970s, and the tightrope walker who crossed the gap between the Twin Towers. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1965, McCann crossed the United States on a bicycle in the 1980s, describing the trip as being “simply to expand my lungs emotionally.”

He is the recipient of several honors, among them the National Book Award, the International DUBLIN Literary Award, and designation as a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres. In 2012 McCann cofounded the nonprofit global story-exchange organization Narrative 4, whose mission is to use storytelling to inspire “fearless hope through radical empathy.” McCann lives in New York with his family and teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Hunter College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, Conversation, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James joined Russell Banks in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, Reading, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, 10 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James with Russell Banks

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, read from his work, then joined Russell Banks in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, Conversation, 29 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen joined Maxine Hong Kingston in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, Reading, 29 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen was introduced by Maxine Hong Kingston, then read from his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston, 29 March 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 29, 2017.

Viet Thanh Nguyen with Maxine Hong Kingston

Viet Thanh Nguyen‘s debut novel is The Sympathizer, winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It is a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam, told in the form of a forced confession by a spy for the communist-held North. The New York Times said of the book, “The great achievement of The Sympathizer is that it gives the Vietnamese a voice and demands that we pay attention. Until now, it’s been largely a one-sided conversation.” Nguyen’s other books are Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War and Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America. His honors include the Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction from the American Library Association, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, a Gold Medal in First Fiction from the California Book Awards, and the Asian/Pacific American Literature Award from the Asian/Pacific American Librarian Association. He is the Aerol Arnold Professor of English and an associate professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Nguyen is currently at work on a short story collection, forthcoming from Grove Press.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Viet Thanh Nguyen, introduced by Maxine Hong Kingston, read from his work then joined Ms. Kingston in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the video recordings of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson, Conversation, 15 February 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 15, 2017.

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and coeditor of The New Fuck You/Adventures in Lesbian Reading. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.” Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014, was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.” Myles has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She contributes to a wide number of publications, including ArtForum, Bookforum, Parkett, and The Believer. Myles lives in New York and Marfa, Texas, and is a professor emeritus at the University of California–San Diego.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in Conversation with Dan Chiasson. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson, Reading, 15 February 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 15, 2017.

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and coeditor of The New Fuck You/Adventures in Lesbian Reading. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.” Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014, was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.” Myles has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She contributes to a wide number of publications, including ArtForum, Bookforum, Parkett, and The Believer. Myles lives in New York and Marfa, Texas, and is a professor emeritus at the University of California–San Diego.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by Dan Chiasson and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts: