Category Archives: Indigenous Communities

Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, Conversation, 24 February 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she joins in conversation with Mililani Trask. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, Talk, 24 February 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is introduced by Mililani Trask and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, 24 February 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 24, 2016.

Winona LaDuke with Mililani Trask, 24 February 2016

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg. She is an indigenous rights activist, an environmentalist, an economist, and a writer, known for her work on tribal land claims and preservation and for sustainable development. She founded and for 25 years served as executive director of the White Earth Land Recovery Program, and is currently executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation. She has served on the boards of the Indigenous Women’s Network and Greenpeace USA, and twice ran as the Green Party’s vice presidential candidate.

LaDuke has written extensively on Native American and environmental issues. Among her books are The Militarization of Indian Country (2011), All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life, and Recovering the Sacred (both books to be re-issued later this year by Haymarket Books).

LaDuke talked about climate change and climate justice in the indigenous peoples’ communities, followed by a talk with Mililani Trask.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

David Suzuki with Clayton Thomas-Müller, Conversation, 7 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 7, 2012.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series. In this episode he is joined in conversation with Clayton Thomas-Müller. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

David Suzuki is a scientist, author, broadcaster, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation, established in 1990 to “work with government, business and individuals to conserve our environment by providing science-based education, advocacy and policy work for social change that today’s situation demands.”

Dr. Suzuki was born in 1936 in Vancouver, British Columbia, and was interned at a Japanese relocation camp during the war years. He attended Amherst College in Massachusetts and received his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Chicago.

The recipient of numerous awards including the 2009 Right Livelihood Award and UNESCO’s Kalinga Prize for the Popularization of Science, Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His newest book is Everything Under the Sun: Toward a Brighter Future on a Small Blue Planet.

He has written, “Each of us is quite literally air, water, soil, and sunlight, and what cleanses and renews these fundamental elements of life is the web of living things on the planet.”

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

David Suzuki with Clayton Thomas-Müller, Talk, 7 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 7, 2012.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series. In this episode he is introduced by Clayton Thomas-Müller, then spoke about the environment with a focus on climate change. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

David Suzuki is a scientist, author, broadcaster, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation, established in 1990 to “work with government, business and individuals to conserve our environment by providing science-based education, advocacy and policy work for social change that today’s situation demands.”

Dr. Suzuki was born in 1936 in Vancouver, British Columbia, and was interned at a Japanese relocation camp during the war years. He attended Amherst College in Massachusetts and received his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Chicago.

The recipient of numerous awards including the 2009 Right Livelihood Award and UNESCO’s Kalinga Prize for the Popularization of Science, Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. His newest book is Everything Under the Sun: Toward a Brighter Future on a Small Blue Planet.

He has written, “Each of us is quite literally air, water, soil, and sunlight, and what cleanses and renews these fundamental elements of life is the web of living things on the planet.”

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Sebastiao Salgado and Eduardo Galeano with Amy Goodman, Conversation, 3 November 2000 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 3 November 2000.

Sebastiao Salgado is a Paris based photojournalist, who has documented the lives of Latin American peasants, diamond mine workers in Brazil, and famine in Africa. His most recent books Migrations: Humanity in Transition and The Children: Refugees and Migrants illuminate the plight of migrants, refugees, and displaced persons all over the world. His previous books include An Uncertain Grace and Workers: An Archaeology of the Industrial Age.

Eduardo Galeano, born in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1940 is an essayist, journalist, historian, and activist. Galeano’s books include the trilogy Memory of Fire; The Book of Embraces; We Say No; and Walking Words. Galeano, who received the first Lannan Prize for Cultural Freedom, has said, “I’m trying to create a synthesis of all different ways of expressing life and reality…I tried to find a way of recounting history so that the reader would feel that it was happening right now, just around the corner—this immediacy, this intensity, which is the beauty and the reality of history.” Galeano’s Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone (Espejos: una historia casi universal) will be published in English by Nation Books in the spring of 2009.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Sebastiao Salgado, Reading, 3 November 2000 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 3 November 2000.

Sebastiao Salgado is a Paris based photojournalist, who has documented the lives of Latin American peasants, diamond mine workers in Brazil, and famine in Africa. His most recent books Migrations: Humanity in Transition and The Children: Refugees and Migrants illuminate the plight of migrants, refugees, and displaced persons all over the world. His previous books include An Uncertain Grace and Workers: An Archaeology of the Industrial Age.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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