Category Archives: Nonfiction

Eve L. Ewing with Wayne Au, Reading, 13 November 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 13, 2019.

Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. Her work has been published in many venues, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic, and the Washington Post.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Eve L. Ewing was introduced by Wayne Au, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Eve L. Ewing with Wayne Au, Conversation, 13 November 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 13, 2019.

Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. Her work has been published in many venues, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic, and the Washington Post.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Eve L. Ewing joined Wayne Au in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Eve L. Ewing with Wayne Au, 13 November 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 13, 2019.

Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. Her work has been published in many venues, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic, and the Washington Post.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Vijay Prashad with Melanie K. Yazzie, Talk, 25 September 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 25, 2019.

Vijay Prashad is a Marxist historian and journalist. He is the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, a movement-driven research institution based in Argentina, Brazil, India, and South Africa. He is also chief editor of LeftWord Books, a 20-year-old Marxist publishing house based in New Delhi. Additionally, Prashad is the chief correspondent for Globetrotter and writes a regular column for Frontline (India) and BirGün (Turkey). He has written 25 books, including The Darker Nations: A Peoples History of the Third World and The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, and has appeared in two films: Shadow World and Two Meetings. For 25 years, he was a professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Vijay Prashad was introduced by Melanie K. Yazzie, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Vijay Prashad with Melanie K. Yazzie, Conversation, 25 September 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 25, 2019.

Vijay Prashad is a Marxist historian and journalist. He is the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, a movement-driven research institution based in Argentina, Brazil, India, and South Africa. He is also chief editor of LeftWord Books, a 20-year-old Marxist publishing house based in New Delhi. Additionally, Prashad is the chief correspondent for Globetrotter and writes a regular column for Frontline (India) and BirGün (Turkey). He has written 25 books, including The Darker Nations: A Peoples History of the Third World and The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, and has appeared in two films: Shadow World and Two Meetings. For 25 years, he was a professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Vijay Prashad joined in conversation with Melanie K. Yazzie. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Vijay Prashad with Melanie K. Yazzie, 25 September 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 25, 2019.

Vijay Prashad is a Marxist historian and journalist. He is the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, a movement-driven research institution based in Argentina, Brazil, India, and South Africa. He is also chief editor of LeftWord Books, a 20-year-old Marxist publishing house based in New Delhi. Additionally, Prashad is the chief correspondent for Globetrotter and writes a regular column for Frontline (India) and BirGün (Turkey). He has written 25 books, including The Darker Nations: A Peoples History of the Third World and The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, and has appeared in two films: Shadow World and Two Meetings. For 25 years, he was a professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Vijay Prashad talked about his work, then joined in conversation with Melanie K. Yazzie.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the video recordings of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Boots Riley with Robin D. G. Kelley, Conversation, 11 September 2019 – Video

CORRECTED. We apologize for the typo on the previous video post.

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 11, 2019.

Boots Riley is a provocative and prolific poet, rapper, songwriter, producer, screenwriter, director, community organizer, and public speaker. He is the lead vocalist of The Coup and Street Sweeper Social Club. His directorial debut, the comedy-fantasy-sci-fi film Sorry to Bother You, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Fervently dedicated to social change, Riley was deeply involved with the Occupy Oakland movement and was one of the leaders of the activist group the Young Comrades. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Tell Homeland Security—We Are the Bomb.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Boots Riley is introduced by and in conversation with Robin D. G. Kelley.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Boots Riley with Robin D. G. Kelley, 11 September 2019 – Audio

Boots Riley in conversation with Robin D. G. Kelley in Santa Fe, NM

Boots Riley is a provocative and prolific poet, rapper, songwriter, producer, screenwriter, director, community organizer, and public speaker. He is the lead vocalist of The Coup and Street Sweeper Social Club. His directorial debut, the comedy-fantasy-sci-fi film Sorry to Bother You, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Fervently dedicated to social change, Riley was deeply involved with the Occupy Oakland movement and was one of the leaders of the activist group the Young Comrades. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Tell Homeland Security—We Are the Bomb.

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 11, 2019.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Boots Riley joined Robin D. G. Kelley in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner, Talk, 17 April 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 17, 2019.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.”

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ruth Wilson Gilmore was introduced by Rachel Kushner, then talked about her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner, Conversation, 17 April 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 17, 2019.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.”

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ruth Wilson Gilmore joined Rachel Kushner in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: