Category Archives: Nonfiction

Nomi Prins with Juliet Schor, Talk, 24 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 24, 2018.

Nomi Prins is a writer, investigative journalist, and public speaker. The author of six books, she is well-known for the exposé It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street and All the Presidents’ Bankers, a narrative about the relationships between presidents and key bankers over the past century and their impact on domestic and foreign policy.

Prins worked on Wall Street before becoming a journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Forbes, The Guardian, The Nation, and other publications, and she is a frequent TV and radio commentator. Governments and policy institutes throughout the world seek her advice on finance and banking.

A new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World, which explores the rise of central bank power and influence in the global financial, economic, and geopolitical hierarchy, is forthcoming in 2018.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Nomi Prins was introduced by Juliet Schor, then talked about her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Nomi Prins with Juliet Schor, Conversation, 24 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 24, 2018.

Nomi Prins is a writer, investigative journalist, and public speaker. The author of six books, she is well-known for the exposé It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street and All the Presidents’ Bankers, a narrative about the relationships between presidents and key bankers over the past century and their impact on domestic and foreign policy.

Prins worked on Wall Street before becoming a journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Forbes, The Guardian, The Nation, and other publications, and she is a frequent TV and radio commentator. Governments and policy institutes throughout the world seek her advice on finance and banking.

A new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World, which explores the rise of central bank power and influence in the global financial, economic, and geopolitical hierarchy, is forthcoming in 2018.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Nomi Prins joined Juliet Schor in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nomi Prins with Juliet Schor, 24 January 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 24, 2018.

Nomi Prins is a writer, investigative journalist, and public speaker. The author of six books, she is well-known for the exposé It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street and All the Presidents’ Bankers, a narrative about the relationships between presidents and key bankers over the past century and their impact on domestic and foreign policy.

Prins worked on Wall Street before becoming a journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Forbes, The Guardian, The Nation, and other publications, and she is a frequent TV and radio commentator. Governments and policy institutes throughout the world seek her advice on finance and banking.

A new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World, which explores the rise of central bank power and influence in the global financial, economic, and geopolitical hierarchy, is forthcoming in 2018.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the video recordings of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, Reading, 29 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 29, 2017.

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and has lived in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. She now lives in New York City. Her works have been widely translated and include the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth, as well as the essay collection Sidewalks, which begins and ends in a cemetery in Venice.

She wrote Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions after working as a volunteer interpreter for Central American immigrant children detained in the United States. In the book she writes, “Children leave their homes with a coyote. They cross Mexico in the hands of this coyote, riding La Bestia. They try not to fall into the hands of rapists, corrupt policemen, murderous soldiers, and drug gangs who might enslave them in poppy or marijuana fields, if they don’t shoot them in the head and mass-bury them.” Luiselli was named one of the 20 best Mexican writers under age 40 by Mexico’s Arts and Culture Council and is completing a PhD in comparative literature at Columbia University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Valeria Luiselli was introduced by Sonia Nazario, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, Conversation, 29 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 29, 2017.

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and has lived in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. She now lives in New York City. Her works have been widely translated and include the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth, as well as the essay collection Sidewalks, which begins and ends in a cemetery in Venice.

She wrote Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions after working as a volunteer interpreter for Central American immigrant children detained in the United States. In the book she writes, “Children leave their homes with a coyote. They cross Mexico in the hands of this coyote, riding La Bestia. They try not to fall into the hands of rapists, corrupt policemen, murderous soldiers, and drug gangs who might enslave them in poppy or marijuana fields, if they don’t shoot them in the head and mass-bury them.” Luiselli was named one of the 20 best Mexican writers under age 40 by Mexico’s Arts and Culture Council and is completing a PhD in comparative literature at Columbia University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Valeria Luiselli joined Sonia Nazario in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, 29 November 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 29, 2017.

Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, Conversation, 29 November 2017

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and has lived in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. She now lives in New York City. Her works have been widely translated and include the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth, as well as the essay collection Sidewalks, which begins and ends in a cemetery in Venice.

She wrote Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions after working as a volunteer interpreter for Central American immigrant children detained in the United States. In the book she writes, “Children leave their homes with a coyote. They cross Mexico in the hands of this coyote, riding La Bestia. They try not to fall into the hands of rapists, corrupt policemen, murderous soldiers, and drug gangs who might enslave them in poppy or marijuana fields, if they don’t shoot them in the head and mass-bury them.” Luiselli was named one of the 20 best Mexican writers under age 40 by Mexico’s Arts and Culture Council and is completing a PhD in comparative literature at Columbia University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Valeria Luiselli read from her work, then joined Sonia Nazario in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the video recordings of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, 3 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Conversation, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy joined Anthony Arnove in conversation. The companion talk is found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Talk, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy was introduced by Anthony Arnove, then talked about her work. You will find the companion conversation online shortly.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Terry Tempest Williams with Colum McCann, Conversation, 8 March 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 8, 2017.

Terry Tempest Williams is an award-winning author, environmentalist, and activist who writes about the intersection of environmental and social justice. A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she is known for her impassioned and lyrical prose. She is the author of the environmental literature classics, Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place; An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field; Desert Quartet; Leap; Red: Patience and Passion in the Desert; The Open Space of Democracy; and Finding Beauty in a Broken World. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Orion Magazine, and numerous anthologies worldwide as a crucial voice for ecological consciousness and social change.

Her newest book is The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, released this year to coincide with the centennial of the National Park Service.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Terry Tempest Williams joined Colum McCann in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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