Category Archives: Video

Posts that have video content.

Eve L. Ewing with Wayne Au, Reading, 13 November 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 13, 2019.

Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. Her work has been published in many venues, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic, and the Washington Post.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Eve L. Ewing was introduced by Wayne Au, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Eve L. Ewing with Wayne Au, Conversation, 13 November 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 13, 2019.

Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. Her work has been published in many venues, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic, and the Washington Post.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Eve L. Ewing joined Wayne Au in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Deborah Levy with John Freeman, Reading, 30 October 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 30, 2019.

Deborah Levy, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, writes fiction, plays, and poetry. Her work has been staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company, broadcast on the BBC, and translated widely across the world. The author of highly praised novels, including Hot Milk and Swimming Home (both Man Booker Prize finalists), The Unloved, and Billy and Girl; the acclaimed story collection Black Vodka; and part one of her working autobiography, Things I Don’t Want to Know, she lives in London. Her latest novel, The Man Who Saw Everything, has been long-listed for the 2019 Booker Prize.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Deborah Levy was introduced by John Freeman, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Deborah Levy with John Freeman, Conversation, 30 October 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 30, 2019.

Deborah Levy, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, writes fiction, plays, and poetry. Her work has been staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company, broadcast on the BBC, and translated widely across the world. The author of highly praised novels, including Hot Milk and Swimming Home (both Man Booker Prize finalists), The Unloved, and Billy and Girl; the acclaimed story collection Black Vodka; and part one of her working autobiography, Things I Don’t Want to Know, she lives in London. Her latest novel, The Man Who Saw Everything, has been long-listed for the 2019 Booker Prize.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Deborah Levy joined John Freeman in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Natalie Scenters-Zapico with Michael Wiegers, Poetry, 13 October 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lannan Meeting House in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 13, 2019.

Natalie Scenters-Zapico is from the sister cities of El Paso, Texas, USA, and Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, México. Her first book, The Verging Cities (Center for Literary Publishing 2015), won the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry, Great Lakes Colleges Association’s New Writers Award, NACCS Foco Book Prize, and the Utah Book Award. Lima :: Limón, her second poetry collection, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2019.

Scenters-Zapico’s poems have appeared in a wide range of anthologies and literary magazines including Best American Poetry 2015, POETRY, Tin House, Kenyon Review, and more. She is a recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship for Poetry, a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, and a CantoMundo fellowship. Scenters-Zapico is poet in residence at the University of Puget Sound.

This was a Poetry Sunday event.

In this episode, Natalie Scenters-Zapico was introduced by Michael Wiegers, then read from her work.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Vijay Prashad with Melanie K. Yazzie, Talk, 25 September 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 25, 2019.

Vijay Prashad is a Marxist historian and journalist. He is the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, a movement-driven research institution based in Argentina, Brazil, India, and South Africa. He is also chief editor of LeftWord Books, a 20-year-old Marxist publishing house based in New Delhi. Additionally, Prashad is the chief correspondent for Globetrotter and writes a regular column for Frontline (India) and BirGün (Turkey). He has written 25 books, including The Darker Nations: A Peoples History of the Third World and The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, and has appeared in two films: Shadow World and Two Meetings. For 25 years, he was a professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Vijay Prashad was introduced by Melanie K. Yazzie, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Vijay Prashad with Melanie K. Yazzie, Conversation, 25 September 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 25, 2019.

Vijay Prashad is a Marxist historian and journalist. He is the director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, a movement-driven research institution based in Argentina, Brazil, India, and South Africa. He is also chief editor of LeftWord Books, a 20-year-old Marxist publishing house based in New Delhi. Additionally, Prashad is the chief correspondent for Globetrotter and writes a regular column for Frontline (India) and BirGün (Turkey). He has written 25 books, including The Darker Nations: A Peoples History of the Third World and The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, and has appeared in two films: Shadow World and Two Meetings. For 25 years, he was a professor at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Vijay Prashad joined in conversation with Melanie K. Yazzie. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Boots Riley with Robin D. G. Kelley, Conversation, 11 September 2019 – Video

CORRECTED. We apologize for the typo on the previous video post.

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 11, 2019.

Boots Riley is a provocative and prolific poet, rapper, songwriter, producer, screenwriter, director, community organizer, and public speaker. He is the lead vocalist of The Coup and Street Sweeper Social Club. His directorial debut, the comedy-fantasy-sci-fi film Sorry to Bother You, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Fervently dedicated to social change, Riley was deeply involved with the Occupy Oakland movement and was one of the leaders of the activist group the Young Comrades. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Tell Homeland Security—We Are the Bomb.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Boots Riley is introduced by and in conversation with Robin D. G. Kelley.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Sebastian Barry with Daniel Mendelsohn, Reading, 1 May 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 1, 2019.

Sebastian Barry is a novelist, poet, and playwright. His latest book, Days without End (2016), tells the story of Thomas McNulty, a 17-year-old fleeing the Great Famine in Ireland by enlisting in the U.S. Army in the 1850s. He is sent to fight Sioux and Yurok Indians and, ultimately, fights in the Civil War. The central love story of the novel is between two men and was inspired by Barry’s son’s homosexual relationship. Of his son’s relationship, Barry states, “I look at them and I think, ‘This is not something that needs our tolerance, this is something we should be emulating. There is magnificence here of soul.'”

The New York Times calls Days without End “a dreamlike Western with a different kind of hero.” He is “an orphan, a refugee from Ireland’s Great Famine, a crack shot, a cross-dresser and a halfhearted soldier, but mostly he’s in love with a young man.” In the novel Barry writes, “A man’s memory might have only a hundred clear days in it and he has lived thousands. Can’t do much about that. We have our store of days and we spend them like forgetful drunkards.” Days without End won the 2017 Costa Book of the Year Award, the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction and the Independent Bookseller’s Award.

Barry’s plays include The Steward of Christendom (1995), Our Lady of Sligo (1998), and The Pride of Parnell Street (2007). His novels include A Long Long Way (2005); The Secret Scripture (2008), named Novel of the Year by the Irish Book Awards and Costa Book of the Year; and The Temporary Gentleman (2014). He has won, among other awards, the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Prize, the Independent Booksellers Prize, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. A Long Long Way and the top-10 best seller The Secret Scripture were short-listed for the Man Booker Prize. He was born in Dublin in 1955 and lives in County Wicklow, Ireland.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Sebastian Barry was introduced by Daniel Mendelsohn, then read from his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Sebastian Barry with Daniel Mendelsohn, Conversation, 1 May 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 1, 2019.

Sebastian Barry is a novelist, poet, and playwright. His latest book, Days without End (2016), tells the story of Thomas McNulty, a 17-year-old fleeing the Great Famine in Ireland by enlisting in the U.S. Army in the 1850s. He is sent to fight Sioux and Yurok Indians and, ultimately, fights in the Civil War. The central love story of the novel is between two men and was inspired by Barry’s son’s homosexual relationship. Of his son’s relationship, Barry states, “I look at them and I think, ‘This is not something that needs our tolerance, this is something we should be emulating. There is magnificence here of soul.'”

The New York Times calls Days without End “a dreamlike Western with a different kind of hero.” He is “an orphan, a refugee from Ireland’s Great Famine, a crack shot, a cross-dresser and a halfhearted soldier, but mostly he’s in love with a young man.” In the novel Barry writes, “A man’s memory might have only a hundred clear days in it and he has lived thousands. Can’t do much about that. We have our store of days and we spend them like forgetful drunkards.” Days without End won the 2017 Costa Book of the Year Award, the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction and the Independent Bookseller’s Award.

Barry’s plays include The Steward of Christendom (1995), Our Lady of Sligo (1998), and The Pride of Parnell Street (2007). His novels include A Long Long Way (2005); The Secret Scripture (2008), named Novel of the Year by the Irish Book Awards and Costa Book of the Year; and The Temporary Gentleman (2014). He has won, among other awards, the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Prize, the Independent Booksellers Prize, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. A Long Long Way and the top-10 best seller The Secret Scripture were short-listed for the Man Booker Prize. He was born in Dublin in 1955 and lives in County Wicklow, Ireland.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Sebastian Barry joined Daniel Mendelsohn in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: