Category Archives: Video

Posts that have video content.

Andrew Bacevich with Marilyn B. Young, Talk, 7 December 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 7, 2016.

Andrew Bacevich is a retired professor of history and international relations at Boston University. He is a graduate of the US Military Academy and received his PhD in American diplomatic history from Princeton University. He served as a commissioned officer in the United States Army for 23 years.

His writings have been published in Foreign Affairs, The Atlantic, Harper’s, The Nation, The New York Times and other publications. He is the author of numerous books, among them The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism; The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War, which received the inaugural Lannan Literary Award for An Especially Notable Book in 2005; Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country, for which he received the 2014 American Book Award and the recently released America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, he is introduced by Marilyn B. Young and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 26 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 26, 2016.

Anne Carson is a Canadian poet, essayist, and professor of classics as well as a translator. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet (1996), traces the concept of eros from ancient Greece to the present. She writes in this book, “The words we read and words we write never say exactly what we mean. The people we love are never just as we desire them. The two symbola never perfectly match. Eros is in between.” Her book Autobiography of Red (1998) is a verse novel inspired by the Greek myth of Geryon and Herakles, set in the modern world. She has published nearly 20 books of poetry, essays, and translations, including An Oresteia (2010), which presents the stories of Agamemnon, Elektra, and Orestes. Carson received a Lannan Literary Award in 1996, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 2000. She is an artist-in-residence at New York University, and teaches in collaboration with her husband, Robert Currie. In 2014 Carson published Red Doc, where her characters Geryon and Herakles from Autobiography of Red return. In this book she warns, “To live past the end of your myth is a perilous thing.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 26 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 26, 2016.

Anne Carson is a Canadian poet, essayist, and professor of classics as well as a translator. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet (1996), traces the concept of eros from ancient Greece to the present. She writes in this book, “The words we read and words we write never say exactly what we mean. The people we love are never just as we desire them. The two symbola never perfectly match. Eros is in between.” Her book Autobiography of Red (1998) is a verse novel inspired by the Greek myth of Geryon and Herakles, set in the modern world. She has published nearly 20 books of poetry, essays, and translations, including An Oresteia (2010), which presents the stories of Agamemnon, Elektra, and Orestes. Carson received a Lannan Literary Award in 1996, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 2000. She is an artist-in-residence at New York University, and teaches in collaboration with her husband, Robert Currie. In 2014 Carson published Red Doc, where her characters Geryon and Herakles from Autobiography of Red return. In this book she warns, “To live past the end of your myth is a perilous thing.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Gideon Levy with David Barsamian, Conversation, 5 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 5, 2016.

Gideon Levy, who was born and resides in Tel Aviv, Israel, is a columnist and member of the editorial board at Haaretz daily newspaper, where he has covered the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza for the last 25 years. The author of The Punishment of Gaza, he has received several peace and freedom awards for his work. In 2015 Levy and Palestinian pastor Mitri Raheb were awarded The 2015 Olof Palme Prize “for their courageous and indefatigable fight against occupation and violence, and for a future Middle East characterized by peaceful coexistence and equality for all.”

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, he is joined in conversation with David Barsamian. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Gideon Levy with David Barsamian, Talk, 5 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 5, 2016.

Gideon Levy, who was born and resides in Tel Aviv, Israel, is a columnist and member of the editorial board at Haaretz daily newspaper, where he has covered the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza for the last 25 years. The author of The Punishment of Gaza, he has received several peace and freedom awards for his work. In 2015 Levy and Palestinian pastor Mitri Raheb were awarded The 2015 Olof Palme Prize “for their courageous and indefatigable fight against occupation and violence, and for a future Middle East characterized by peaceful coexistence and equality for all.”

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, he is introduced by David Barsamian and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ru Freeman with John Freeman, Conversation, 21 September 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 21, 2016.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan-born writer and activist whose creative and political writing has appeared internationally. She is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editors’ Choice. On Sal Mal Lane takes place off a major road in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo, home to Sinhalese, Tamils, Burghers, and Muslims. Of their differences, Freeman writes, “To the untrained eye, the physical distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamil races was so subtle that only the natives could distinguish one from the other, pointing to the drape of a sari, the cheekbones on a face, the scent of hair oil to clarify. But distinctions there were, and the natural order of things would eventually come to pass: resentments would grow…” Both of Freeman’s novels have been translated into several languages, including Italian, French, Hebrew, and Chinese. In 2015 she edited the anthology Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine, bringing together the work of 65 writers and poets. She blogs for the Huffington Post on literature and politics, is a contributing member of the Asian American Literary Review editorial board, and has been a fellow with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. ​She is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for fiction and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman. Freeman was a Lannan Residency Fellow in the winter of 2016.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation John Freeman. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ru Freeman with John Freeman, Reading, 21 September 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 21, 2016.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan-born writer and activist whose creative and political writing has appeared internationally. She is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editors’ Choice. On Sal Mal Lane takes place off a major road in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo, home to Sinhalese, Tamils, Burghers, and Muslims. Of their differences, Freeman writes, “To the untrained eye, the physical distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamil races was so subtle that only the natives could distinguish one from the other, pointing to the drape of a sari, the cheekbones on a face, the scent of hair oil to clarify. But distinctions there were, and the natural order of things would eventually come to pass: resentments would grow…” Both of Freeman’s novels have been translated into several languages, including Italian, French, Hebrew, and Chinese. In 2015 she edited the anthology Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine, bringing together the work of 65 writers and poets. She blogs for the Huffington Post on literature and politics, is a contributing member of the Asian American Literary Review editorial board, and has been a fellow with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. ​She is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for fiction and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman. Freeman was a Lannan Residency Fellow in the winter of 2016.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by John Freeman and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Louise Glück with Peter Streckfus, Conversation, 11 May 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 11, 2016.

Louise Glück, a former Poet Laureate of the United States, is the author of over a dozen books of poetry including Faithful and Virtuous Night (winner of the National Book Award for Poetry) and her recent anthology, Poems: 1962-2012. Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Hass has called her “one of the purest and most accomplished lyric poets now writing.”
Glück taught at Williams College for 20 years and is currently Rosenkranz writer-in-residence at Yale University. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 1999 was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Her numerous books of poetry include A Village Life (2009), The Seven Ages (2001), and The Wild Iris (1992), for which she received the Pulitzer Prize. Louise Glück says of writing, “[It] is not decanting of personality. The truth, on the page, need not have been lived. It is, instead, all that can be envisioned.”

This was a Lannan Literary event.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation with Peter Streckfus. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Louise Glück with Peter Streckfus, Reading, 11 May 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 11, 2016.

Louise Glück, a former Poet Laureate of the United States, is the author of over a dozen books of poetry including Faithful and Virtuous Night (winner of the National Book Award for Poetry) and her recent anthology, Poems: 1962-2012. Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Hass has called her “one of the purest and most accomplished lyric poets now writing.”
Glück taught at Williams College for 20 years and is currently Rosenkranz writer-in-residence at Yale University. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 1999 was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Her numerous books of poetry include A Village Life (2009), The Seven Ages (2001), and The Wild Iris (1992), for which she received the Pulitzer Prize. Louise Glück says of writing, “[It] is not decanting of personality. The truth, on the page, need not have been lived. It is, instead, all that can be envisioned.”

This was a Lannan Literary event.

In this episode, she is introduced by Peter Streckfus and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Karl Ove Knausgaard with Zadie Smith, Conversation, 27 April 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 27, 2016.

Karl Ove Knausgaard is a Norwegian author whose books include A Time for Everything and Out of the World as well as his six volume, 3,600 page autobiographical novel, My Struggle. Dubbed “a Norwegian Marcel Proust,” Knausgaard begins his story in Book One almost ten years after his father has drunk himself to death. Reflecting on this time while embarking on a new novel, the author breaks down his own life story to its most elemental occurrences. Long passages reflecting on art, literature and music are interspersed with everyday details in the life of an ordinary Scandinavian.

Translated into English by Don Bartlett, Books Two through Five (with translation of Six forthcoming) continue Knausgaard’s epic, with deep introspection on love, family, friends, childhood and coming of age. Reflecting on the history of notions of life and death, Knausgaard asks: “What was man on this earth other than an insect among other insects, a life-form among other life-forms, which might just as well take the form of algae in a lake or fungi on the forest floor, roe in a fish’s stomach, rats in a nest or a cluster of mussels on a reef?”

This was a Lannan Literary event.

In this episode, he is joined in conversation with Zadie Smith. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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