Category Archives: Video

Posts that have video content.

Aleksandar Hemon with John Freeman, Reading, 28 February 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 28, 2018.

Aleksandar Hemon’s books include the novels The Making of Zombie Wars and Nowhere Man, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the story collections The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles. Born in Sarajevo in the former Yugoslavia in 1964, Hemon was visiting Chicago as a tourist in 1992 when the Bosnian War broke out. Unable to return home, he eventually settled permanently in Chicago.

Having arrived with only a basic command of English, Hemon learned the language by reading the novels of Vladimir Nabokov; he published his first story in English in 1995. The New Yorker described him as having an “astonishing talent to notice the world with a sarcastic, wily precision that is then put in tension with his love of surreal metaphor.”

Hemon’s writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, and the New York Times, with more recent work addressing issues of immigration and the Trump administration. In a piece entitled “When Neighbors Turn on Each Other, It Happens Fast,” he writes, “Nevertheless, the question remains what happens to that sense of ethical stability when there is a societal rupture, when the infrastructure that allows for essentialist individualism is damaged and destroyed?” Hemon was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003 and received a MacArthur “genius grant” the following year. He lives in Chicago with his family.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Aleksandar Hemon was introduced by John Freeman, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Aleksandar Hemon with John Freeman, Conversation, 28 February 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 28, 2018.

Aleksandar Hemon’s books include the novels The Making of Zombie Wars and Nowhere Man, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the story collections The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles. Born in Sarajevo in the former Yugoslavia in 1964, Hemon was visiting Chicago as a tourist in 1992 when the Bosnian War broke out. Unable to return home, he eventually settled permanently in Chicago.

Having arrived with only a basic command of English, Hemon learned the language by reading the novels of Vladimir Nabokov; he published his first story in English in 1995. The New Yorker described him as having an “astonishing talent to notice the world with a sarcastic, wily precision that is then put in tension with his love of surreal metaphor.”

Hemon’s writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, and the New York Times, with more recent work addressing issues of immigration and the Trump administration. In a piece entitled “When Neighbors Turn on Each Other, It Happens Fast,” he writes, “Nevertheless, the question remains what happens to that sense of ethical stability when there is a societal rupture, when the infrastructure that allows for essentialist individualism is damaged and destroyed?” Hemon was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003 and received a MacArthur “genius grant” the following year. He lives in Chicago with his family.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Aleksandar Hemon joined John Freeman in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Colum McCann with Gabriel Byrne, Reading, 31 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 31, 2018.

Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories, including Let the Great World Spin, TransAtlantic, and Thirteen Ways of Looking. In a 2013 interview the author said, “I believe in the democracy of storytelling. That stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries. I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story or to listen to a story.”

McCann’s books cover a wide range of topics, including The Troubles in Northern Ireland, the life of Russian dancer Rudolf Nureyev, the first attempted nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1919, New York of the 1970s, and the tightrope walker who crossed the gap between the Twin Towers. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1965, McCann crossed the United States on a bicycle in the 1980s, describing the trip as being “simply to expand my lungs emotionally.”

He is the recipient of several honors, among them the National Book Award, the International DUBLIN Literary Award, and designation as a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres. In 2012 McCann cofounded the nonprofit global story-exchange organization Narrative 4, whose mission is to use storytelling to inspire “fearless hope through radical empathy.” McCann lives in New York with his family and teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Hunter College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Colum McCann was introduced by Gabriel Byrne, then read from his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Colum McCann with Gabriel Byrne, Conversation, 31 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 31, 2018.

Colum McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories, including Let the Great World Spin, TransAtlantic, and Thirteen Ways of Looking. In a 2013 interview the author said, “I believe in the democracy of storytelling. That stories can cross all sorts of borders and boundaries. I don’t know of a greater privilege than being allowed to tell a story or to listen to a story.”

McCann’s books cover a wide range of topics, including The Troubles in Northern Ireland, the life of Russian dancer Rudolf Nureyev, the first attempted nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1919, New York of the 1970s, and the tightrope walker who crossed the gap between the Twin Towers. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1965, McCann crossed the United States on a bicycle in the 1980s, describing the trip as being “simply to expand my lungs emotionally.”

He is the recipient of several honors, among them the National Book Award, the International DUBLIN Literary Award, and designation as a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres. In 2012 McCann cofounded the nonprofit global story-exchange organization Narrative 4, whose mission is to use storytelling to inspire “fearless hope through radical empathy.” McCann lives in New York with his family and teaches creative writing in the MFA program at Hunter College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Colum McCann joined Gabriel Byrne in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nomi Prins with Juliet Schor, Talk, 24 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 24, 2018.

Nomi Prins is a writer, investigative journalist, and public speaker. The author of six books, she is well-known for the exposé It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street and All the Presidents’ Bankers, a narrative about the relationships between presidents and key bankers over the past century and their impact on domestic and foreign policy.

Prins worked on Wall Street before becoming a journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Forbes, The Guardian, The Nation, and other publications, and she is a frequent TV and radio commentator. Governments and policy institutes throughout the world seek her advice on finance and banking.

A new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World, which explores the rise of central bank power and influence in the global financial, economic, and geopolitical hierarchy, is forthcoming in 2018.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Nomi Prins was introduced by Juliet Schor, then talked about her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nomi Prins with Juliet Schor, Conversation, 24 January 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 24, 2018.

Nomi Prins is a writer, investigative journalist, and public speaker. The author of six books, she is well-known for the exposé It Takes a Pillage: Behind the Bonuses, Bailouts, and Backroom Deals from Washington to Wall Street and All the Presidents’ Bankers, a narrative about the relationships between presidents and key bankers over the past century and their impact on domestic and foreign policy.

Prins worked on Wall Street before becoming a journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Forbes, The Guardian, The Nation, and other publications, and she is a frequent TV and radio commentator. Governments and policy institutes throughout the world seek her advice on finance and banking.

A new book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World, which explores the rise of central bank power and influence in the global financial, economic, and geopolitical hierarchy, is forthcoming in 2018.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Nomi Prins joined Juliet Schor in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, Reading, 29 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 29, 2017.

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and has lived in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. She now lives in New York City. Her works have been widely translated and include the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth, as well as the essay collection Sidewalks, which begins and ends in a cemetery in Venice.

She wrote Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions after working as a volunteer interpreter for Central American immigrant children detained in the United States. In the book she writes, “Children leave their homes with a coyote. They cross Mexico in the hands of this coyote, riding La Bestia. They try not to fall into the hands of rapists, corrupt policemen, murderous soldiers, and drug gangs who might enslave them in poppy or marijuana fields, if they don’t shoot them in the head and mass-bury them.” Luiselli was named one of the 20 best Mexican writers under age 40 by Mexico’s Arts and Culture Council and is completing a PhD in comparative literature at Columbia University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Valeria Luiselli was introduced by Sonia Nazario, then read from her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Valeria Luiselli with Sonia Nazario, Conversation, 29 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 29, 2017.

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and has lived in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. She now lives in New York City. Her works have been widely translated and include the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth, as well as the essay collection Sidewalks, which begins and ends in a cemetery in Venice.

She wrote Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions after working as a volunteer interpreter for Central American immigrant children detained in the United States. In the book she writes, “Children leave their homes with a coyote. They cross Mexico in the hands of this coyote, riding La Bestia. They try not to fall into the hands of rapists, corrupt policemen, murderous soldiers, and drug gangs who might enslave them in poppy or marijuana fields, if they don’t shoot them in the head and mass-bury them.” Luiselli was named one of the 20 best Mexican writers under age 40 by Mexico’s Arts and Culture Council and is completing a PhD in comparative literature at Columbia University.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Valeria Luiselli joined Sonia Nazario in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Óscar Martí­nez with Alfredo Corchado, Talk, 1 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 1, 2017.

Óscar Martínez is an award-winning Salvadoran investigative journalist and co-founder of elfaro.net, the first online newspaper in Latin America providing in-depth coverage of migration, violence and organized crime in Central America. Martínez has received numerous awards for his journalism. In 2008, he won Mexico’s Fernando Benítez National Journalism Award; in 2009, he was awarded the Human Rights Prize at the José Simeón Cañas Central American University in El Salvador; in 2016 The Committee to Protect Journalists awarded him an International Press Freedom Award. In 2016 he was also awarded the Maria Moors Cabot Prize, which honors journalists for their outstanding coverage of the Americas.

He is the author of The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail (for which he was awarded the WOLA-Duke Book Award in 2014) and the recent A History of Violence: Living and Dying in Central America. A new book, El Niño de Hollywood (forthcoming in 2018), is about a member of the international criminal gang Mara Salvatrucha (also known as MS-13) who was assassinated in El Salvador for cooperating with law enforcement.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Óscar Martí­­nez was introduced by Alfredo Corchado, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Óscar Martí­­nez with Alfredo Corchado, Conversation, 1 November 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 1, 2017.

Óscar Martínez is an award-winning Salvadoran investigative journalist and co-founder of elfaro.net, the first online newspaper in Latin America providing in-depth coverage of migration, violence and organized crime in Central America. Martínez has received numerous awards for his journalism. In 2008, he won Mexico’s Fernando Benítez National Journalism Award; in 2009, he was awarded the Human Rights Prize at the José Simeón Cañas Central American University in El Salvador; in 2016 The Committee to Protect Journalists awarded him an International Press Freedom Award. In 2016 he was also awarded the Maria Moors Cabot Prize, which honors journalists for their outstanding coverage of the Americas.

He is the author of The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail (for which he was awarded the WOLA-Duke Book Award in 2014) and the recent A History of Violence: Living and Dying in Central America. A new book, El Niño de Hollywood (forthcoming in 2018), is about a member of the international criminal gang Mara Salvatrucha (also known as MS-13) who was assassinated in El Salvador for cooperating with law enforcement.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Óscar Martí­­nez joined Alfredo Corchado in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: