Tracy K. Smith with Joy Harjo, Conversation, 6 February 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 6, 2019.

Tracy K. Smith was appointed the 22nd United States poet laureate in 2017 and was reappointed for a second term in 2018. During her first term, Smith gave readings and led discussions as a part of a pilot project in rural communities in New Mexico, South Carolina, and Kentucky. She has continued to pursue engagements in small towns across America, stating, “Poetry invites us to listen to other voices, to make space for other perspectives, and to care about the lives of others who may not look, sound or think like ourselves.” Her poem “The United States Welcomes You” begins:

Why and by whose power were you sent?
What do you see that you may wish to steal?
Why this dancing? Why do your dark bodies
Drink up all the light?

Her memoir Ordinary Light (2016) was described by the Guardian as “A powerful meditation on being a daughter and, by the end, on being a mother, too.” In it she writes of her mother’s impending death: “When the dark outside was real*not just the dark of approaching winter, and not just the dark of rain, which we’d had for days, too*her dying came on. We recognized it. We circled her bed, though we stopped short of holding hands, perhaps because that gesture would have meant we were holding on, and we were finally ready to let her go.”

Smith has published four books of poetry: Wade in the Water (2018); Life on Mars, which received the 2012 Pulitzer Prize and was selected as a New York Times Notable Book; Duende (2006); and The Body’s Question, winner of the 2002 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. She received her undergraduate degree from Harvard, earned her MFA at Columbia, and was a Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University from 1997 to 1999. She is the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Tracy K. Smith joined Joy Harjo in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Tracy K. Smith with Joy Harjo, 6 February 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 6, 2019.

Trady K. Smith with Joy Harjo

Tracy K. Smith was appointed the 22nd United States poet laureate in 2017 and was reappointed for a second term in 2018. During her first term, Smith gave readings and led discussions as a part of a pilot project in rural communities in New Mexico, South Carolina, and Kentucky. She has continued to pursue engagements in small towns across America, stating, “Poetry invites us to listen to other voices, to make space for other perspectives, and to care about the lives of others who may not look, sound or think like ourselves.” Her poem “The United States Welcomes You” begins:

Why and by whose power were you sent?
What do you see that you may wish to steal?
Why this dancing? Why do your dark bodies
Drink up all the light?

Her memoir Ordinary Light (2016) was described by the Guardian as “A powerful meditation on being a daughter and, by the end, on being a mother, too.” In it she writes of her mother’s impending death: “When the dark outside was real*not just the dark of approaching winter, and not just the dark of rain, which we’d had for days, too*her dying came on. We recognized it. We circled her bed, though we stopped short of holding hands, perhaps because that gesture would have meant we were holding on, and we were finally ready to let her go.”

Smith has published four books of poetry: Wade in the Water (2018); Life on Mars, which received the 2012 Pulitzer Prize and was selected as a New York Times Notable Book; Duende (2006); and The Body’s Question, winner of the 2002 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. She received her undergraduate degree from Harvard, earned her MFA at Columbia, and was a Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University from 1997 to 1999. She is the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ilan Pappé with Dima Khalidi, Talk, 23 January 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 23, 2019.

Ilan Pappé is an expatriate Israeli historian and socialist activist, educated at the University of Jerusalem and the University of Oxford. He founded the Academic Institute for Peace in Givat Haviva, Israel, and was its director from 1992 to 2000. He was also chair of the Emil Tuma Institute for Palestine Studies in Haifa. His 2016 book The Biggest Prison on Earth: A History of the Occupied Territories received the Palestine Book Award. He has published 17 other books and is currently a professor at the University of Exeter.

Pappé’s research contextualizes the history of Palestine into a larger global context of settler colonialism. His historiography challenges the dominant Israeli narrative. He writes, “Standing idle while the American-Israeli vision of strangling the Strip to death, cleansing half of the West bank from its indigenous population and threatening the rest of the Palestinians…”inside Israel and in the other parts of the West Bank…”with transfer, is not an option. It is tantamount to ‘decent’ people’s silence during the Holocaust.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ilan Pappé was introduced by Dima Khalidi, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ilan Pappé with Dima Khalidi, Conversation, 23 January 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 23, 2019.

Ilan Pappé is an expatriate Israeli historian and socialist activist, educated at the University of Jerusalem and the University of Oxford. He founded the Academic Institute for Peace in Givat Haviva, Israel, and was its director from 1992 to 2000. He was also chair of the Emil Tuma Institute for Palestine Studies in Haifa. His 2016 book The Biggest Prison on Earth: A History of the Occupied Territories received the Palestine Book Award. He has published 17 other books and is currently a professor at the University of Exeter.

Pappé’s research contextualizes the history of Palestine into a larger global context of settler colonialism. His historiography challenges the dominant Israeli narrative. He writes, “Standing idle while the American-Israeli vision of strangling the Strip to death, cleansing half of the West bank from its indigenous population and threatening the rest of the Palestinians…”inside Israel and in the other parts of the West Bank…”with transfer, is not an option. It is tantamount to ‘decent’ people’s silence during the Holocaust.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ilan Pappé joined Dima Khalidi in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ilan Pappé with Dima Khalidi, 23 January 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 23, 2019.

Ilan Pappé with Dima Khalidi.

Ilan Pappé is an expatriate Israeli historian and socialist activist, educated at the University of Jerusalem and the University of Oxford. He founded the Academic Institute for Peace in Givat Haviva, Israel, and was its director from 1992 to 2000. He was also chair of the Emil Tuma Institute for Palestine Studies in Haifa. His 2016 book The Biggest Prison on Earth: A History of the Occupied Territories received the Palestine Book Award. He has published 17 other books and is currently a professor at the University of Exeter.

Pappé’s research contextualizes the history of Palestine into a larger global context of settler colonialism. His historiography challenges the dominant Israeli narrative. He writes, “Standing idle while the American-Israeli vision of strangling the Strip to death, cleansing half of the West bank from its indigenous population and threatening the rest of the Palestinians…”inside Israel and in the other parts of the West Bank…”with transfer, is not an option. It is tantamount to ‘decent’ people’s silence during the Holocaust.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ilan Pappé talked about his work, then joined Dima Khalidi in conversation.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

David Harvey with Laura Flanders, Talk, 24 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 24, 2018.

David Harvey, a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, has taught Karl Marx’s Capital and its contemporary application to students and members of the public for 40 years. “Once you can hang a price tag on something,” he argues, “you can in principle put a price tag on anything, including conscience and honor, to say nothing of body parts and children.

His most recent book is Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason (2017), and his A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005) is considered a primer on that critical topic across academic fields. He is the author of 27 other books. Harvey is responsible for transforming urban geography into a cutting-edge field that attracts leading scholars who ask big questions and study interconnected systems of power. Having received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, he is a fellow in the British Academy and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, David Harvey was introduced by Laura Flanders, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

David Harvey with Laura Flanders, Conversation, 24 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 24, 2018.

David Harvey, a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, has taught Karl Marx’s Capital and its contemporary application to students and members of the public for 40 years. “Once you can hang a price tag on something,” he argues, “you can in principle put a price tag on anything, including conscience and honor, to say nothing of body parts and children.

His most recent book is Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason (2017), and his A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005) is considered a primer on that critical topic across academic fields. He is the author of 27 other books. Harvey is responsible for transforming urban geography into a cutting-edge field that attracts leading scholars who ask big questions and study interconnected systems of power. Having received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, he is a fellow in the British Academy and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, David Harvey joined Laura Flanders in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

David Harvey with Laura Flanders, 24 October 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 24, 2018.

David Harvey with Laura Flanders

David Harvey, a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, has taught Karl Marx’s Capital and its contemporary application to students and members of the public for 40 years. “Once you can hang a price tag on something,” he argues, “you can in principle put a price tag on anything, including conscience and honor, to say nothing of body parts and children.

His most recent book is Marx, Capital, and the Madness of Economic Reason (2017), and his A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005) is considered a primer on that critical topic across academic fields. He is the author of 27 other books. Harvey is responsible for transforming urban geography into a cutting-edge field that attracts leading scholars who ask big questions and study interconnected systems of power. Having received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, he is a fellow in the British Academy and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II, Talk, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II was introduced by Khury Petersen-Smith, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II, Conversation, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II joined Khury Petersen-Smith in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: