Tag Archives: African American

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor with Donna Murch, Conversation, 20 January 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 20, 2016.

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is assistant professor at the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University. She writes about Black politics, housing inequality and issues of race and class in the U.S. Her articles have been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, Jacobin, New Politics, The Black Commentator, Black Agenda Report, Ms., and elsewhere.

A recipient of a Lannan Residency Fellowship, her book, From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation is forthcoming in 2016.

Taylor talked about the Black liberation movement and the current and historical struggles of African Americans against police violence and for equal rights, followed by a talk with Donna Murch.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation with Donna Murch. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor with Donna Murch, Talk, 20 January 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 20, 2016.

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is assistant professor at the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University. She writes about Black politics, housing inequality and issues of race and class in the U.S. Her articles have been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, Jacobin, New Politics, The Black Commentator, Black Agenda Report, Ms., and elsewhere.

A recipient of a Lannan Residency Fellowship, her book, From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation is forthcoming in 2016.

Taylor talked about the Black liberation movement and the current and historical struggles of African Americans against police violence and for equal rights, followed by a talk with Donna Murch.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

In this episode, she is introduced by Donna Murch and then gives a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor with Donna Murch, 20 January 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 20, 2016.

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor with Donna Murch, 20 January 2016

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is assistant professor at the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University. She writes about Black politics, housing inequality and issues of race and class in the U.S. Her articles have been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, Jacobin, New Politics, The Black Commentator, Black Agenda Report, Ms., and elsewhere.

A recipient of a Lannan Residency Fellowship, her book, From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation is forthcoming in 2016.

Taylor talked about the Black liberation movement and the current and historical struggles of African Americans against police violence and for equal rights, followed by a talk with Donna Murch.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

[audio:http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.lannan.org/podcasts/taylor-160120.mp3|artists=Lannan Readings and Conversations|titles=Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor with Donna Murch]

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Elizabeth Alexander with Maureen Corrigan, Conversation, 30 September 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 30, 2015.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Elizabeth Alexander is a poet, essayist, playwright and author of the recent memoir, The Light of the World, a story of love and loss following the sudden death of her husband. Of the book, Joyce Carol Oates said, “Both a memoir and a portrait of marriage, The Light of the World, is as its title suggests, a bittersweet testament to love and the memory of love, one of the most compelling memoirs of loss that I have ever read.”

Elizabeth Alexander composed and delivered a poem, “Praise Song for the Day,” at the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009. Alexander has been contributing to ongoing conversations about race, immigration, and social justice throughout her career. She once remarked, “Poetry is not meant to cheer; rather, poetry challenges, and moves us towards transformation.”

The former Chair of Yale University’s Department of African American Studies, Alexander serves as Yale’s Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of African American Studies and the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She has received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the first Alphonse Fletcher St. Fellowship. Dr. Alexander is currently at work on an anthology of 300 years of African American poetry.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Maureen Corrigan. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Elizabeth Alexander with Maureen Corrigan, Reading, 30 September 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 30, 2015.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Elizabeth Alexander is a poet, essayist, playwright and author of the recent memoir, The Light of the World, a story of love and loss following the sudden death of her husband. Of the book, Joyce Carol Oates said, “Both a memoir and a portrait of marriage, The Light of the World, is as its title suggests, a bittersweet testament to love and the memory of love, one of the most compelling memoirs of loss that I have ever read.”

Elizabeth Alexander composed and delivered a poem, “Praise Song for the Day,” at the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009. Alexander has been contributing to ongoing conversations about race, immigration, and social justice throughout her career. She once remarked, “Poetry is not meant to cheer; rather, poetry challenges, and moves us towards transformation.”

The former Chair of Yale University’s Department of African American Studies, Alexander serves as Yale’s Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of African American Studies and the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She has received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the first Alphonse Fletcher St. Fellowship. Dr. Alexander is currently at work on an anthology of 300 years of African American poetry.

In this episode she is introduced by Maureen Corrigan and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Elizabeth Alexander with Maureen Corrigan, 30 September 2015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 30, 2015.

Elizabeth Alexander with Maureen Corrigan, 30 September 2015

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Elizabeth Alexander is a poet, essayist, playwright and author of the recent memoir, The Light of the World, a story of love and loss following the sudden death of her husband. Of the book, Joyce Carol Oates said, “Both a memoir and a portrait of marriage, The Light of the World, is as its title suggests, a bittersweet testament to love and the memory of love, one of the most compelling memoirs of loss that I have ever read.”

Elizabeth Alexander composed and delivered a poem, “Praise Song for the Day,” at the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009. Alexander has been contributing to ongoing conversations about race, immigration, and social justice throughout her career. She once remarked, “Poetry is not meant to cheer; rather, poetry challenges, and moves us towards transformation.”

The former Chair of Yale University’s Department of African American Studies, Alexander serves as Yale’s Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of African American Studies and the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She has received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the first Alphonse Fletcher St. Fellowship. Dr. Alexander is currently at work on an anthology of 300 years of African American poetry.

[audio:http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.lannan.org/podcasts/alexander-150930.mp3|artists=Lannan Readings and Conversations|titles=Elizabeth Alexander with Maureen Corrigan]

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Audience Q&A, Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective, Part 7, 12 December 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 12, 2013.

“Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective Reunion Tour” with Natasha Trethewey, Major Jackson, Thomas Sayers Ellis, John Keene, Tisa Bryant, Sharan Strange, and saxophonist James Brandon Lewis.

The Dark Room Collective was formed in 1988 in Boston by a group of young African American poets as a means of providing community to both established and emerging writers in the form of a reading series. This 25th Anniversary event with nearly all of the original founding members marks the end of the group’s reunion tour.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode, The Dark Room Collective answered questions from the audience. Supplementary episodes from this event may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Natasha Trethewey, Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective, Part 6, 12 December 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 12, 2013.

“Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective Reunion Tour” with Natasha Trethewey, Major Jackson, Thomas Sayers Ellis, John Keene, Tisa Bryant, Sharan Strange, and saxophonist James Brandon Lewis.

The Dark Room Collective was formed in 1988 in Boston by a group of young African American poets as a means of providing community to both established and emerging writers in the form of a reading series. This 25th Anniversary event with nearly all of the original founding members marks the end of the group’s reunion tour.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode, Natasha Trethewey read from her work. Supplementary episodes from this event may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Major Jackson, Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective, Part 5, 12 December 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 12, 2013.

“Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective Reunion Tour” with Natasha Trethewey, Major Jackson, Thomas Sayers Ellis, John Keene, Tisa Bryant, Sharan Strange, and saxophonist James Brandon Lewis.

The Dark Room Collective was formed in 1988 in Boston by a group of young African American poets as a means of providing community to both established and emerging writers in the form of a reading series. This 25th Anniversary event with nearly all of the original founding members marks the end of the group’s reunion tour.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode, Major Jackson read from his work. Supplementary episodes from this event may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Thomas Sayers Ellis with James Brandon Lewis on Saxophone, Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective, Part 4, 12 December 2013 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 12, 2013.

“Nothing Personal: The Dark Room Collective Reunion Tour” with Natasha Trethewey, Major Jackson, Thomas Sayers Ellis, John Keene, Tisa Bryant, Sharan Strange, and saxophonist James Brandon Lewis.

The Dark Room Collective was formed in 1988 in Boston by a group of young African American poets as a means of providing community to both established and emerging writers in the form of a reading series. This 25th Anniversary event with nearly all of the original founding members marks the end of the group’s reunion tour.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

In this episode, Thomas Sayers Ellis read from his work and was joined by James Brandon Lewis on the saxophone. Supplementary episodes from this event may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts: