Tag Archives: environment

Dahr Jamail with William Rivers Pitt, Talk, 13 March 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 13, 2019.

Dahr Jamail is an award-winning author and journalist. In 2003 he was one of very few unembedded journalists in the early stages of the Iraq War. He has written for Le Monde Diplomatique, the Guardian, the Nation, the Huffington Post, the Sunday Herald in Scotland, and Foreign Policy in Focus, and has contributed to Democracy Now!, Al Jazeera, Al Jazeera English, the BBC, NPR, and numerous other radio and television stations around the globe. In 2008 he was awarded the Martha Gellhorn Award for Investigative Journalism, and in 2018 the Part Center for Independent Media at Ithaca College awarded him an Izzy for his “path-breaking and in-depth reporting,” work that exposed “environmental hazards and militarism.” He is the author of Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq (2007), The Will to Resist: Soldiers Who Refuse to Fight in Iraq and Afghanistan (2009), and The Mass Destruction of Iraq: The Disintegration of a Nation: Why It Is Happening, and Who Is Responsible (2014).

Jamail is now a senior investigative journalist for Truthout.org. There he reports on climate disruption in the Anthropocene, digesting the most cutting-edge scientific evidence for a socially conscious and activist lay audience. His new book The End of Ice (The New Press, 2018) looks at the effects of climate disruption as he witnessed them firsthand as a young mountain guide on Denali. He writes, “On the one hand, the experience of being on ice that is thousands of years old and often hundreds if not thousands of feet thick is humbling. The accompanying awe of this reality, coupled with the sheer beauty of these landscapes carved by and now covered with glaciers is not to be missed… [but] witnessing these dramatic impacts from anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) first-hand always feels like a gut punch to me. My climbing partners and I shook our heads at the spectacle, then carried on to the edge of the glacier in order to unrope and ascend the moraine.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Dahr Jamail was introduced by William Rivers Pitt, then talked about and read from his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Dahr Jamail with William Rivers Pitt, Conversation, 13 March 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 13, 2019.

Dahr Jamail is an award-winning author and journalist. In 2003 he was one of very few unembedded journalists in the early stages of the Iraq War. He has written for Le Monde Diplomatique, the Guardian, the Nation, the Huffington Post, the Sunday Herald in Scotland, and Foreign Policy in Focus, and has contributed to Democracy Now!, Al Jazeera, Al Jazeera English, the BBC, NPR, and numerous other radio and television stations around the globe. In 2008 he was awarded the Martha Gellhorn Award for Investigative Journalism, and in 2018 the Part Center for Independent Media at Ithaca College awarded him an Izzy for his “path-breaking and in-depth reporting,” work that exposed “environmental hazards and militarism.” He is the author of Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq (2007), The Will to Resist: Soldiers Who Refuse to Fight in Iraq and Afghanistan (2009), and The Mass Destruction of Iraq: The Disintegration of a Nation: Why It Is Happening, and Who Is Responsible (2014).

Jamail is now a senior investigative journalist for Truthout.org. There he reports on climate disruption in the Anthropocene, digesting the most cutting-edge scientific evidence for a socially conscious and activist lay audience. His new book The End of Ice (The New Press, 2018) looks at the effects of climate disruption as he witnessed them firsthand as a young mountain guide on Denali. He writes, “On the one hand, the experience of being on ice that is thousands of years old and often hundreds if not thousands of feet thick is humbling. The accompanying awe of this reality, coupled with the sheer beauty of these landscapes carved by and now covered with glaciers is not to be missed… [but] witnessing these dramatic impacts from anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) first-hand always feels like a gut punch to me. My climbing partners and I shook our heads at the spectacle, then carried on to the edge of the glacier in order to unrope and ascend the moraine.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Dahr Jamail joined William Rivers Pitt in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Dahr Jamail with William Rivers Pitt, 13 March 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 13, 2019.

Dahr Jamail with William Rivers Pitt

Dahr Jamail is an award-winning author and journalist. In 2003 he was one of very few unembedded journalists in the early stages of the Iraq War. He has written for Le Monde Diplomatique, the Guardian, the Nation, the Huffington Post, the Sunday Herald in Scotland, and Foreign Policy in Focus, and has contributed to Democracy Now!, Al Jazeera, Al Jazeera English, the BBC, NPR, and numerous other radio and television stations around the globe. In 2008 he was awarded the Martha Gellhorn Award for Investigative Journalism, and in 2018 the Part Center for Independent Media at Ithaca College awarded him an Izzy for his “path-breaking and in-depth reporting,” work that exposed “environmental hazards and militarism.” He is the author of Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq (2007), The Will to Resist: Soldiers Who Refuse to Fight in Iraq and Afghanistan (2009), and The Mass Destruction of Iraq: The Disintegration of a Nation: Why It Is Happening, and Who Is Responsible (2014).

Jamail is now a senior investigative journalist for Truthout.org. There he reports on climate disruption in the Anthropocene, digesting the most cutting-edge scientific evidence for a socially conscious and activist lay audience. His new book The End of Ice (The New Press, 2018) looks at the effects of climate disruption as he witnessed them firsthand as a young mountain guide on Denali. He writes, “On the one hand, the experience of being on ice that is thousands of years old and often hundreds if not thousands of feet thick is humbling. The accompanying awe of this reality, coupled with the sheer beauty of these landscapes carved by and now covered with glaciers is not to be missed… [but] witnessing these dramatic impacts from anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) first-hand always feels like a gut punch to me. My climbing partners and I shook our heads at the spectacle, then carried on to the edge of the glacier in order to unrope and ascend the moraine.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith, Talk, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II was introduced by Khury Petersen-Smith, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith, Conversation, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II joined Khury Petersen-Smith in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith, 11 October 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, 3 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Conversation, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition);Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy joined Anthony Arnove in conversation. The companion talk is found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Arundhati Roy with Anthony Arnove, Talk, 3 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 3, 2017.

Arundhati Roy is an Indian author, actor, and political activist. She is well-known for her book The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and for her outspoken advocacy of environmental and human rights causes, which has often placed her at odds with Indian legal authorities and her country’s middle-class establishment.

She is the author of An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire; Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers; Capitalism: A Ghost Story; The End of Imagination (new edition); Things That Can and Cannot Be Said (with John Cusack); and The Doctor and the Saint: Caste, Race, and Annihilation of Caste, the Debate Between B.R. Ambedkar and M.K. Gandhi.  A new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness, is forthcoming in June 2017.

Roy is the recipient of the 2002 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

This was an In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom event.

In this episode, Arundhati Roy was introduced by Anthony Arnove, then talked about her work. You will find the companion conversation online shortly.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there (to be posted soon). Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Naomi Klein with Katharine Viner, Conversation, 29 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 29, 2015.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, fellow at The Nation Institute, and author of the international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies. Her regular column for The Nation and The Guardian is distributed internationally by The New York Times Syndicate. In 2004 Klein won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for her reporting from Iraq for Harper’s Magazine. The same year, she released The Take, a feature documentary about Argentina’s occupied factories, co-produced with Avi Lewis.

Her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, to be published in September, examines why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Katharine Viner. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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