Tag Archives: essays

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Reading 2, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of works of fiction, nonfiction, and short stories including The Art Fair and Three Thousand Dollars. He contributes essays to NPR’s program, All Things Considered, and his work has appeared in numerous national publications including Harper’s, The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Magazine Writing, and The New York Times Book Review. Lipsky is the recipient of a Lambert Fellowship, a Media Award from GLAAD, and a National Magazine Award. In 2010, he published Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace, about a five-day road trip he took with David Foster Wallace. Lipsky teaches at New York University.
David Lipsky Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Reading 1, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

Rick Moody has been celebrated in America for twenty years for his work in fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. His first novel, Garden State (1992), was the winner of the 1991 Editor’s Choice Award from the Pushcart Press. His second, The Ice Storm, was published in May 1994. Many novels and collections of novellas and short fiction and a memoir have followed to much acclaim including The Ring of Brightest Angels Around Heaven (1995), Demonology (2001), and Right Livelihoods (2007). Moody’s latest novel, The Four Fingers of Death, was released in 2010. He is the secretary of the PEN American Center, NY, and he co-founded the Young Lions Book Award at the New York Public Library. He has taught at the State University of New York at Purchase, the Bennington College Writing Seminars, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the New School for Social Research. Moody was born in New York City, attended Brown and Columbia Universities, and lives in Brooklyn, NY.
Rick Moody Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of works of fiction, nonfiction, and short stories including The Art Fair and Three Thousand Dollars.
David Lipsky Bio and Cross Links

Rick Moody has been celebrated in America for twenty years for his work in fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. His first novel, Garden State (1992), was the winner of the 1991 Editor’s Choice Award from the Pushcart Press.
Rick Moody Bio and Cross Links

Joanna Scott is the author of eight novels, including Liberation, Tourmaline, Make Believe, The Manikin, Arrogance, and most recently Follow Me (2009) as well as two collections of short fiction, Various Antidotes and Everybody Loves Somebody.
Joanna Scott Bio and Cross Links

Michael Silverblatt, a New York native, studied at Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of such cutting-edge author-teachers as Donald Barthelme and John Barth.
Michael Silverblatt Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Hans Magnus Enzensberger with Charles Simic, Conversation, 11 December 2002 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 11 December 2002.

Hans Magnus Enzensberger, considered Germany’s most important living poet, is also a highly regarded essayist, journalist, dramatist, editor, publisher, and translator. Born in 1929 in Bavaria, he was educated in German universities and also the Sorbonne in Paris. His many awards include the Nuremberg Cultural Prize and the Pasolini Prize. The most recent volume of his poems to be translated (by Michael Hamburger) into English is Kiosk, published in 1997.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

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Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Reading, 11 December 2002 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 11 December 2002.

Hans Magnus Enzensberger, considered Germany’s most important living poet, is also a highly regarded essayist, journalist, dramatist, editor, publisher, and translator. Born in 1929 in Bavaria, he was educated in German universities and also the Sorbonne in Paris. His many awards include the Nuremberg Cultural Prize and the Pasolini Prize. The most recent volume of his poems to be translated (by Michael Hamburger) into English is Kiosk, published in 1997.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Michael Cunningham with Stacey D’Erasmo, Conversation, 14 November 2001 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 14 November 2001.

Michael Cunningham was raised in Los Angeles and educated at Stanford University and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His novels include A Home at the End of the World, Flesh and Blood, and The Hours, which won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the PEN/Faulkner Award and was chosen as a Best Book of 1998 by The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times. He currently lives in New York City.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Michael Cunningham, Reading, 14 November 2001 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 14 November 2001.

Michael Cunningham was raised in Los Angeles and educated at Stanford University and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His novels include A Home at the End of the World, Flesh and Blood, and The Hours, which won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the PEN/Faulkner Award and was chosen as a Best Book of 1998 by The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times. He currently lives in New York City.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Billy Collins with Henry Taylor, Conversation, 26 September 2001 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 26 September 2001.

Billy Collins’ poetry books are Picnic, Lightning; The Art of Drowning; Questions about Angels, which was a National Poetry Series winner; and The Apple that Astonished Paris. He has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, The National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Mr. Collins, who lives in New York and teaches at Lehman College, has been the United States Poet Laureate.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Billy Collins, Reading, 26 September 2001 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 26 September 2001.

Billy Collins’ poetry books are Picnic, Lightning; The Art of Drowning; Questions about Angels, which was a National Poetry Series winner; and The Apple that Astonished Paris. He has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, The National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Mr. Collins, who lives in New York and teaches at Lehman College, has been the United States Poet Laureate.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Tom Engelhardt with Jeremy Scahill, Conversation, 2 February 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 2, 2011.

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the TomDispatch.com website, self-described as being “for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of our post-9/11 world and a clear sense of how our imperial globe actually works.” In his recent book, The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s, Engelhardt documents Washington’s ongoing commitment to military bases to preserve, and extend, its empire; reveals damning information about the American reliance on airpower, at great cost to civilians in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan; and shows that the U.S. empire has deep historical roots that precede the George W. Bush administration–and continue today into the presidency of Barack Obama. He is the author of a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his TomDispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. For 15 years, he was Senior Editor at Pantheon Books where he edited and published award-winning works ranging from Art Spiegelman’s Maus and John Dower’s War Without Mercy to Eduardo Galeano’s Memory of Fire trilogy. He is now Consulting Editor at Metropolitan Books, as well as co-founder and co-editor of Metropolitan’s the American Empire Project. TomDispatch.com, which he has fondly called “the sideline that ate my life,” is a project of The Nation Institute, where Engelhardt is a fellow.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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