Tag Archives: Jamaica

Marlon James with Russell Banks, Conversation, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James joined Russell Banks in conversation. You can find the companion reading here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Marlon James with Russell Banks, Reading, 10 May 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Marlon James with Russell Banks, 10 May 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 10, 2017.

Marlon James with Russell Banks

Marlon James’s A Brief History of Seven Killings was the winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, making him the first Jamaican writer to receive the UK’s most prestigious literary award. The book presents an untold history of Jamaica in the 1970s, relayed through multiple narrators, with the climax centering on an attempted assassination of reggae legend Bob Marley. Describing the book for the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani wrote, “It’s like a Tarantino remake of ‘The Harder They Come’ but with a soundtrack by Bob Marley and a script by Oliver Stone and William Faulkner, with maybe a little creative boost from some primo ganja.” James’s other novels include John Crow’s Devil, the story of a biblical struggle in a remote village in Jamaica in the 1950s, and The Book of Night Women, about a slave revolt on a Jamaican plantation in the early nineteenth century. James’s poignant essay on his experience of coming out, “From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself,” appeared in the New York Times Magazine in March 2015. James lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and teaches English and creative writing at Macalester College.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Marlon James was introduced by Russell Banks, read from his work, then joined Russell Banks in conversation.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Kwami Dawes with Chris Abani, Conversation, 29 September 2010 Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 29, 2010.

Kwame Dawes is a writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and plays. Born in Ghana in 1962, Dawes spent most of his childhood and early adult life in Jamaica. As a poet, he is profoundly influenced by the rhythms and textures of that lush place, citing in a recent interview his “spiritual, intellectual, and emotional engagement with reggae music.” His book Bob Marley: Lyrical Genius remains the most authoritative study of the lyrics of Bob Marley. Dawes has also published 15 collections of poetry. His most recent titles include Back of Mount Peace and Hope’s Hospice. His book, Requiem is a suite of poems inspired by the illustrations of African American artist Tom Feelings in his landmark book The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo. He has also published two novels: Bivouac and She’s Gone, winner of the 2008 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Debut Fiction. In 2007 he released a memoir, A Far Cry From Plymouth Rock: A Personal Narrative, called “a poet’s eloquent meditation on the complexities of history, race and the oft-broken promise of America,” by Geoff Dyer.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

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Kwami Dawes, Reading, 29 September 2010 Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 29, 2010.

Kwame Dawes is a writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and plays. Born in Ghana in 1962, Dawes spent most of his childhood and early adult life in Jamaica. As a poet, he is profoundly influenced by the rhythms and textures of that lush place, citing in a recent interview his “spiritual, intellectual, and emotional engagement with reggae music.” His book Bob Marley: Lyrical Genius remains the most authoritative study of the lyrics of Bob Marley. Dawes has also published 15 collections of poetry. His most recent titles include Back of Mount Peace and Hope’s Hospice. His book, Requiem is a suite of poems inspired by the illustrations of African American artist Tom Feelings in his landmark book The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo. He has also published two novels: Bivouac and She’s Gone, winner of the 2008 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Debut Fiction. In 2007 he released a memoir, A Far Cry From Plymouth Rock: A Personal Narrative, called “a poet’s eloquent meditation on the complexities of history, race and the oft-broken promise of America,” by Geoff Dyer.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Kwame Dawes with Chris Abani, 29 September 2010 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 29, 2010.

Kwame Dawes is a writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and plays. Born in Ghana in 1962, Dawes spent most of his childhood and early adult life in Jamaica. As a poet, he is profoundly influenced by the rhythms and textures of that lush place, citing in a recent interview his “spiritual, intellectual, and emotional engagement with reggae music.” His book Bob Marley: Lyrical Genius remains the most authoritative study of the lyrics of Bob Marley. Dawes has also published 15 collections of poetry. His most recent titles include Back of Mount Peace and Hope’s Hospice. His book, Requiem is a suite of poems inspired by the illustrations of African American artist Tom Feelings in his landmark book The Middle Passage: White Ships/Black Cargo. He has also published two novels: Bivouac and She’s Gone, winner of the 2008 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Debut Fiction. In 2007 he released a memoir, A Far Cry From Plymouth Rock: A Personal Narrative, called “a poet’s eloquent meditation on the complexities of history, race and the oft-broken promise of America,” by Geoff Dyer.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts