Tag Archives: michael silverblatt

Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 26 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 26, 2016.

Anne Carson is a Canadian poet, essayist, and professor of classics as well as a translator. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet (1996), traces the concept of eros from ancient Greece to the present. She writes in this book, “The words we read and words we write never say exactly what we mean. The people we love are never just as we desire them. The two symbola never perfectly match. Eros is in between.” Her book Autobiography of Red (1998) is a verse novel inspired by the Greek myth of Geryon and Herakles, set in the modern world. She has published nearly 20 books of poetry, essays, and translations, including An Oresteia (2010), which presents the stories of Agamemnon, Elektra, and Orestes. Carson received a Lannan Literary Award in 1996, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 2000. She is an artist-in-residence at New York University, and teaches in collaboration with her husband, Robert Currie. In 2014 Carson published Red Doc, where her characters Geryon and Herakles from Autobiography of Red return. In this book she warns, “To live past the end of your myth is a perilous thing.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 26 October 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 26, 2016.

Anne Carson is a Canadian poet, essayist, and professor of classics as well as a translator. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet (1996), traces the concept of eros from ancient Greece to the present. She writes in this book, “The words we read and words we write never say exactly what we mean. The people we love are never just as we desire them. The two symbola never perfectly match. Eros is in between.” Her book Autobiography of Red (1998) is a verse novel inspired by the Greek myth of Geryon and Herakles, set in the modern world. She has published nearly 20 books of poetry, essays, and translations, including An Oresteia (2010), which presents the stories of Agamemnon, Elektra, and Orestes. Carson received a Lannan Literary Award in 1996, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 2000. She is an artist-in-residence at New York University, and teaches in collaboration with her husband, Robert Currie. In 2014 Carson published Red Doc, where her characters Geryon and Herakles from Autobiography of Red return. In this book she warns, “To live past the end of your myth is a perilous thing.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt, 26 October 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 26, 2016.

Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt

Anne Carson is a Canadian poet, essayist, and professor of classics as well as a translator. Her first book, Eros the Bittersweet (1996), traces the concept of eros from ancient Greece to the present. She writes in this book, “The words we read and words we write never say exactly what we mean. The people we love are never just as we desire them. The two symbola never perfectly match. Eros is in between.” Her book Autobiography of Red (1998) is a verse novel inspired by the Greek myth of Geryon and Herakles, set in the modern world. She has published nearly 20 books of poetry, essays, and translations, including An Oresteia (2010), which presents the stories of Agamemnon, Elektra, and Orestes. Carson received a Lannan Literary Award in 1996, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1998, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 2000. She is an artist-in-residence at New York University, and teaches in collaboration with her husband, Robert Currie. In 2014 Carson published Red Doc, where her characters Geryon and Herakles from Autobiography of Red return. In this book she warns, “To live past the end of your myth is a perilous thing.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

[audio:http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.lannan.org/podcasts/carson-161026.mp3|artists=Lannan Readings and Conversations|titles=Anne Carson with Michael Silverblatt]

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 15 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 15 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then read from his work along with Deborah Eisenberg. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt, 15 April 2015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 15, 2015.

Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt

Wallace Shawn, along with Deborah Eisenberg, read from his play, The Designated Mourner, and then joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Wallace Shawn, playwright, actor, screenwriter, and essayist has said, “I don’t know about you, but I only have one life, and I don’t want to spend it in a sewer of injustice.” Best known for his roles in My Dinner with André and as Vizzini in The Princess Bride, Shawn also has had an illustrious career in theater, both as an actor and writer. His plays include Grasses of a Thousand Colors and The Designated Mourner, described by The Times (London) as “…highly unconventional, much concerned with matters of politics, culture and human significance.”

Shawn has written on subjects such as war, money, sex, and aesthetics. In his collection entitled Essays: Wallace Shawn, he writes, “Every once in a while, though, I like to take a break from fantasy land, and I go off to the place called Reality for a brief vacation.”

[audio:http://s3.amazonaws.com/media.lannan.org/podcasts/shawn-150415.mp3|artists=Lannan Readings and Conversations|titles=Wallace Shawn with Michael Silverblatt]

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Alice McDermott with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 22 October 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 22, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Alice McDermott has, in the words of The New York Times, “staked an impressive claim on a subject matter and a turf–Irish American Catholic families congregated, for the most part, in New York City and its suburbs on Long Island.” Her seven works of fiction include At Weddings and Wakes, Charming Billy, and Child of My Heart: A Novel. Her most recent book, Someone, follows the everyday rhythms in the life of Marie, an ordinary Irish-American girl from Brooklyn in the 1930s, of which she said, “Setting the story there–not in the literal, geographical Brooklyn but in the one of memory, of romanticized recollection–is my way of visiting a place that I suspect never really existed.”

McDermott currently teaches at Johns Hopkins University as the Richard A. Macksey Professor of Humanities.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Alice McDermott with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 22 October 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 22, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Alice McDermott has, in the words of The New York Times, “staked an impressive claim on a subject matter and a turf–Irish American Catholic families congregated, for the most part, in New York City and its suburbs on Long Island.” Her seven works of fiction include At Weddings and Wakes, Charming Billy, and Child of My Heart: A Novel. Her most recent book, Someone, follows the everyday rhythms in the life of Marie, an ordinary Irish-American girl from Brooklyn in the 1930s, of which she said, “Setting the story there–not in the literal, geographical Brooklyn but in the one of memory, of romanticized recollection–is my way of visiting a place that I suspect never really existed.”

McDermott currently teaches at Johns Hopkins University as the Richard A. Macksey Professor of Humanities.

In this episode she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

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Alice McDermott with Michael Silverblatt, 22 October 2014 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 22, 2014.

Alice McDermott with Michael Silverblatt

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Alice McDermott has, in the words of The New York Times, “staked an impressive claim on a subject matter and a turf–Irish American Catholic families congregated, for the most part, in New York City and its suburbs on Long Island.” Her seven works of fiction include At Weddings and Wakes, Charming Billy, and Child of My Heart: A Novel. Her most recent book, Someone, follows the everyday rhythms in the life of Marie, an ordinary Irish-American girl from Brooklyn in the 1930s, of which she said, “Setting the story there–not in the literal, geographical Brooklyn but in the one of memory, of romanticized recollection–is my way of visiting a place that I suspect never really existed.”

McDermott currently teaches at Johns Hopkins University as the Richard A. Macksey Professor of Humanities.

[audio:http://media.lannan.org.s3.amazonaws.com/podcasts/mcdermott-141022.mp3|artists=Lannan Readings and Conversations|titles=Alice McDermott with Michael Silverblatt]

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Colm Tóibín with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 21 May 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 21, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Colm Tóibín is one of the most distinct and multi-layered voices in modern Irish fiction, noting, “I think fiction lends itself to messiness rather than the ideal, and plays well with the ironies surrounding what happens versus what should happen.” Aside from being a novelist, he is also a playwright, essayist, editor and journalist. Two of his books, The Blackwater Lightship and The Master, a novel depicting the interior life of writer Henry James, were shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and his play The Testament of Mary was nominated for a 2013 Tony Award.

Tóibín’s Love in a Dark Time: And Other Explorations of Gay Lives and Literature considers the topic through the lives and works of notable cultural figures such as Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Bishop and Pedro Almodóvar. He is a member of Aosdána: the Irish Association of Artists and currently teaches creative writing at Columbia University.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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