Tag Archives: michael silverblatt

Colm Tóibín with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 21 May 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 21, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Colm Tóibín is one of the most distinct and multi-layered voices in modern Irish fiction, noting, “I think fiction lends itself to messiness rather than the ideal, and plays well with the ironies surrounding what happens versus what should happen.” Aside from being a novelist, he is also a playwright, essayist, editor and journalist. Two of his books, The Blackwater Lightship and The Master, a novel depicting the interior life of writer Henry James, were shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and his play The Testament of Mary was nominated for a 2013 Tony Award.

Tóibín’s Love in a Dark Time: And Other Explorations of Gay Lives and Literature considers the topic through the lives and works of notable cultural figures such as Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Bishop and Pedro Almodóvar. He is a member of Aosdána: the Irish Association of Artists and currently teaches creative writing at Columbia University.

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Colm Tóibín with Michael Silverblatt, 21 May 2014 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 21, 2014.

Colm Tóibín with Michael Silverblatt

This event was part of the Lannan Literary series.

Colm Tóibín is one of the most distinct and multi-layered voices in modern Irish fiction, noting, “I think fiction lends itself to messiness rather than the ideal, and plays well with the ironies surrounding what happens versus what should happen.” Aside from being a novelist, he is also a playwright, essayist, editor and journalist. Two of his books, The Blackwater Lightship and The Master, a novel depicting the interior life of writer Henry James, were shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and his play The Testament of Mary was nominated for a 2013 Tony Award.

Tóibín’s Love in a Dark Time: And Other Explorations of Gay Lives and Literature considers the topic through the lives and works of notable cultural figures such as Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Bishop and Pedro Almodóvar. He is a member of Aosdána: the Irish Association of Artists and currently teaches creative writing at Columbia University.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, 18 April 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 18 April, 2012.

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 18 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2012.

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 18 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2012.

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, 28 March 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.” Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Conversation, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of works of fiction, nonfiction, and short stories including The Art Fair and Three Thousand Dollars.
David Lipsky Bio and Cross Links

Rick Moody has been celebrated in America for twenty years for his work in fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. His first novel, Garden State (1992), was the winner of the 1991 Editor’s Choice Award from the Pushcart Press.
Rick Moody Bio and Cross Links

Joanna Scott is the author of eight novels, including Liberation, Tourmaline, Make Believe, The Manikin, Arrogance, and most recently Follow Me (2009) as well as two collections of short fiction, Various Antidotes, and Everybody Loves Somebody.
Joanna Scott Bio and Cross Links

Michael Silverblatt, a New York native, studied at Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of such cutting-edge author-teachers as Donald Barthelme and John Barth.
Michael Silverblatt Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Reading 3, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

Joanna Scott is the author of eight novels, including Liberation, Tourmaline, Make Believe, The Manikin, Arrogance, and most recently Follow Me (2009) as well as two collections of short fiction, Various Antidotes and Everybody Loves Somebody. Her stories and essays have appeared in numerous journals such as The Paris Review, Harper’s, Esquire, and Conjunctions and she has reviewed for The New York Times, The Nation, and The Los Angeles Times. Scott has been honored with a MacArthur Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her books have been finalists for the Pulizter Prize, the PEN/Faulkner Award, and The Los Angeles Times Book Award. She is the Roswell Smith Burrows Professor of English at the University of Rochester.
Joanna Scott Bio and Cross Links

Michael Silverblatt, a New York native, studied at Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of such cutting-edge author-teachers as Donald Barthelme and John Barth. Dubbed “the best reader in America” by Norman Mailer, he is the host of the literary talk show Bookworm, which he created in 1989 for KCRW 89.9 FM in Santa Monica. He has participated in numerous Readings & Conversations programs, interviewing Gore Vidal, Susan Sontag, Salman Rushdie, and A.S. Byatt, among others. Bookworm airs locally on KSFR 101.1FM every Sunday at 1:30pm.
Michael Silverblatt Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.