Tag Archives: michael silverblatt

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Reading 2, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of works of fiction, nonfiction, and short stories including The Art Fair and Three Thousand Dollars. He contributes essays to NPR’s program, All Things Considered, and his work has appeared in numerous national publications including Harper’s, The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Magazine Writing, and The New York Times Book Review. Lipsky is the recipient of a Lambert Fellowship, a Media Award from GLAAD, and a National Magazine Award. In 2010, he published Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace, about a five-day road trip he took with David Foster Wallace. Lipsky teaches at New York University.
David Lipsky Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace, Reading 1, 16 March 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

Rick Moody has been celebrated in America for twenty years for his work in fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. His first novel, Garden State (1992), was the winner of the 1991 Editor’s Choice Award from the Pushcart Press. His second, The Ice Storm, was published in May 1994. Many novels and collections of novellas and short fiction and a memoir have followed to much acclaim including The Ring of Brightest Angels Around Heaven (1995), Demonology (2001), and Right Livelihoods (2007). Moody’s latest novel, The Four Fingers of Death, was released in 2010. He is the secretary of the PEN American Center, NY, and he co-founded the Young Lions Book Award at the New York Public Library. He has taught at the State University of New York at Purchase, the Bennington College Writing Seminars, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the New School for Social Research. Moody was born in New York City, attended Brown and Columbia Universities, and lives in Brooklyn, NY.
Rick Moody Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Everything and More: A Tribute to David Foster Wallace – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 16, 2011.

David Foster Wallace (1962-2008) was one of the most acclaimed and influential American writers of his generation. A gifted novelist, essayist and humorist, he is best known for his 1996 opus, the novel Infinite Jest. His other books include his debut novel The Broom of the System (1987), followed by the short story collections Girl With Curious Hair (1989) and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (1999), the essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005), and the nonfiction work Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity (2003). He received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1987, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction in 1996, and a MacArthur Fellowship in 1997. Wallace was born in Ithaca, New York, educated at Amherst College, and lived for many years in Illinois. He taught creative writing at Pomona College in Claremont, California, from 2002 until his death in 2008.

book cover graphic An evening in celebration of the life and work of DAVID FOSTER WALLACE (1962-2008). Writers David Lipsky, Rick Moody, and Joanna Scott will read some of their favorite selections from Wallace’s writings followed by an in depth discussion moderated by Michael Silverblatt, host of the radio interview program, Bookworm.

Abstraction has all kinds of problems and headaches built in, we all know. Part of the hazard is how we use nouns. We think of nouns’ meanings in terms of denotations. Nouns stand for things–man, desk, pen, David, head, aspirin. A special kind of comedy results when there’s confusion about what’s a real noun, as in ‘Who’s on first?’ or those Alice in Wonderland routines–’What can you see on the road?’ ‘Nothing.’ ‘What great eyesight! What does nothing look like?’ The comedy tends to vanish, though, when the nouns denote abstractions, meaning general concepts divorced from particular instances. Many of these abstraction-nouns come from root verbs. ‘Motion’ is a noun, and ‘existence’; we use words like this all the time. The confusion comes when we try to consider what exactly they mean.
– From Everything and More.

David Lipsky is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of works of fiction, nonfiction, and short stories including The Art Fair and Three Thousand Dollars.
David Lipsky Bio and Cross Links

Rick Moody has been celebrated in America for twenty years for his work in fiction, nonfiction, and short stories. His first novel, Garden State (1992), was the winner of the 1991 Editor’s Choice Award from the Pushcart Press.
Rick Moody Bio and Cross Links

Joanna Scott is the author of eight novels, including Liberation, Tourmaline, Make Believe, The Manikin, Arrogance, and most recently Follow Me (2009) as well as two collections of short fiction, Various Antidotes and Everybody Loves Somebody.
Joanna Scott Bio and Cross Links

Michael Silverblatt, a New York native, studied at Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of such cutting-edge author-teachers as Donald Barthelme and John Barth.
Michael Silverblatt Bio and Cross Links

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

John Balaban with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 6 November 2002 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 6, 2002.

John Balaban is the author of eleven books of poetry and prose, a translator of Vietnamese poetry, and a past president of the American Literary Translators Association.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Annie Proulx with Michael Silverblatt, 4 June 2008 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on June 4, 2008.

Annie Proulx in conversation with Michael Silverblatt at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Wednesday, June 4, 2008. Photo: Don Usner
Annie Proulx’s books include the novels The Shipping News and That Old Ace in the Hole; and the story collections Close Range: Wyoming Stories; and its sequel, Bad Dirt. Through Proulx’s knowledge of the history of Wyoming and the West, her interest in landscape and place, and her sympathy for the sheer will it takes to survive, we see the seared heart of the rugged people who live in our least populated state. Her novel The Shipping News and her short story “Brokeback Mountain” have both been adapted into celebrated feature films. The Los Angeles Times says Proulx, “has a wry sense of humor rather like Mark Twain’s.”

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Additional photos from this event are available on Flickr.

John Barth with Michael Silverblatt, 25 April 2001 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 25, 2001.

John Barth’s novels include Once Upon a Time: A Floating Opera; The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor; Tidewater Tales; Sabbatical: A Romance; Giles Goat-Boy or, The Revised New Syllabus; and The Sot-Weed Factor. His two short story collections are On with the Story and Lost in the Funhouse.

Mr. Barth has written, “We tell stories and listen to them because we live stories and live in them. Narrative equals language equals life: To cease to narrate…is to die.” Mr. Barth, who is professor emeritus at Johns Hopkins University, received the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Sharon Olds with Michael Silverblatt, 10 April 2002 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 10, 2002.

Sharon Olds was born in San Francisco and educated at Stanford and Columbia universities. Her books include Blood, Tin, Straw; The Dead and the Living; The Father; The Gold Cell; and The Wellspring. Ms. Olds teaches at New York University and helps run its writing workshop program at Goldwater Hospital, a public facility for the severely physically challenged. Ms. Olds served as the New York State Poet Laureate from 1998 to 2000.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Gore Vidal with Michael Silverblatt, 9 May 2007 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 9, 2007.

Gore Vidal (right) in conversation with Michael Silverblatt at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Wednesday, May 9, 2007. Photo: Don Usner
Gore Vidal is the author of twenty-two novels, five plays, many screenplays, more than two hundred essays, and the critically lauded, Palimpsest: A Memoir. Vidal’s United States (Essays 1952-1992) won the 1993 National Book Award. In its “American Masters” series PBS said “Vidal’s lineage in American literature may be traced back to Henry James, the sophisticated American from the upper echelons of society who mingles with European sophisticates, and Mark Twain, the raw humorist and critic of American empire.”

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Dave Eggers and Vendela Vida with Michael Silverblatt, 25 April 2007 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 25, 2007.

Dave Eggers (far left) and Vendela Vida (far right) in conversation with Michael Silverblatt at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Wednesday, April 25, 2007. Photo: Don Usner

Dave Eggers is the author of A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, of which the Washington Post said, “Eggers evokes the terrible beauty of youth like a young Bob Dylan, frothing with furious anger.” He is also the author of You Shall Know Our Velocity!, and How We Are Hungry. In 1998, he founded McSweeney’s, an independent publishing house now located in San Francisco.

Vendela Vida is the author of Girls on the Verge, a journalistic study of female initiation rituals. She is also the author of a novel, And Now You Can Go, which begins with its narrator, 21 year old Ellis, being forced at gunpoint to sit and talk with a man in a New York City park as he contemplates a murder/suicide. She is the co-editor of the Believer magazine and the editor of The Believer Book of Writers Talking to Writers.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Additional photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Robert Coover with Michael Silverblatt, 11 October 2006 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11th, 2006.

Robert Coover has been described by The New York Times as, “one of America’s quirkiest writers, if by ‘quirky’ we mean an unwillingness to abide by ordinary fictional rules and a conviction that a novel is primarily a verbal artifact unconvertible to other media.” His novel, The Public Burning, is a long and fantastic fictional account of the events surrounding the executions for espionage of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg in 1952, whose principal narrator identifies himself as the then-Vice President of the United States, Richard Milhous Nixon. His other publications include Spanking the Maid, Gerald’s Party, Pinocchio in Venice, and Briar Rose.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.