Tag Archives: Nonfiction

Hamid Dabashi with David Barsamian, Conversation, 5 December 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 5, 2012.

Hamid Dabashi was born in the Khuzestan province of Iran and received his college education in Tehran before moving to the U.S. where he received a dual Ph.D. in Sociology of Culture and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. He is Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His newest book, The World of Persian Literary Humanism, is forthcoming in October 2012.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with David Barsamian. The companion Talk may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Hamid Dabashi with David Barsamian, Talk, 5 December 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 5, 2012.

Hamid Dabashi was born in the Khuzestan province of Iran and received his college education in Tehran before moving to the U.S. where he received a dual Ph.D. in Sociology of Culture and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. He is Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His newest book, The World of Persian Literary Humanism, is forthcoming in October 2012.

In this episode he is introduced by David Barsamian and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Chris Hedges with Reverend Jeremiah Wright, Conversation, 12 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Newberry Library in Chicago on 12 November, 2012.

Chris Hedges, who has written, “The rush of battle is often a potent and lethal addiction, for war is a drug,” is a senior fellow at The Nation Institute and publishes a regular column on truthdig.com. Hedges, a veteran war correspondent, has survived ambushes in Central America, imprisonment in Sudan, and a beating by Saudi military police. He is the author of What Every Person Should Know About War, a stark look at the effects of war on combatants and the book War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning. Hedges joined the staff of The New York Times in 1990 and was part of the team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He spent seven years as The Times Middle East Bureau Chief after having worked for The Dallas Morning News, The Christian Science Monitor, and National Public Radio. In 2002, he received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism. A graduate of the Harvard Divinity School, Hedges has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton University. His most recent book is Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle. His other publications include I Don’t Believe in Atheists and Collateral Damage: America’s War Against Iraqi Civilians. Hedges is currently at work on a book on poverty in the U.S. with the graphic illustrator Joe Sacco.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Reverend Jeremiah Wright. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may listen to an audio recording of this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

Chris Hedges with Reverend Jeremiah Wright, Talk, 12 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Newberry Library in Chicago on 12 November, 2012.

Chris Hedges, who has written, “The rush of battle is often a potent and lethal addiction, for war is a drug,” is a senior fellow at The Nation Institute and publishes a regular column on truthdig.com. Hedges, a veteran war correspondent, has survived ambushes in Central America, imprisonment in Sudan, and a beating by Saudi military police. He is the author of What Every Person Should Know About War, a stark look at the effects of war on combatants and the book War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning. Hedges joined the staff of The New York Times in 1990 and was part of the team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He spent seven years as The Times Middle East Bureau Chief after having worked for The Dallas Morning News, The Christian Science Monitor, and National Public Radio. In 2002, he received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism. A graduate of the Harvard Divinity School, Hedges has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton University. His most recent book is Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle. His other publications include I Don’t Believe in Atheists and Collateral Damage: America’s War Against Iraqi Civilians. Hedges is currently at work on a book on poverty in the U.S. with the graphic illustrator Joe Sacco.

In this episode he is introduced by Reverend Jeremiah Wright and then spoke about poverty in the U.S. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may listen to an audio recording of this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

Kevin Young with Colson Whitehead, Conversation, 14 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 14, 2012.

Kevin Young often finds meaning and inspiration for his poetry in African American music, particularly the blues. His seven collections include Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebellion (Knopf, 2011) and Dear Darkness. His Jelly Roll: A Blues, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and winner of the Paterson Poetry Prize. He is the editor of five volumes, including 2010’s The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief and Healing. His recent book The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness won the 2010 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and combines essay, cultural criticism, and lyrical chorus to illustrate ways African American culture is American culture. “I don’t mean to taxonomize but to rhapsodize. Take it from me—mean mean mean to be free.”

He is the Atticus Haygood Professor of Creative Writing and English and Curator of Literary Collections and the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library at Emory University in Atlanta.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Colson Whitehead. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Kevin Young with Colson Whitehead, Reading, 14 November 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 14, 2012.

Kevin Young often finds meaning and inspiration for his poetry in African American music, particularly the blues. His seven collections include Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebellion (Knopf, 2011) and Dear Darkness. His Jelly Roll: A Blues, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and winner of the Paterson Poetry Prize. He is the editor of five volumes, including 2010’s The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief and Healing. His recent book The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness won the 2010 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and combines essay, cultural criticism, and lyrical chorus to illustrate ways African American culture is American culture. “I don’t mean to taxonomize but to rhapsodize. Take it from me—mean mean mean to be free.”

He is the Atticus Haygood Professor of Creative Writing and English and Curator of Literary Collections and the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library at Emory University in Atlanta.

In this episode he is introduced by Colson Whitehead and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

John Sayles with Francisco Goldman, Conversation, 18 January 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 18, 2012.

John Sayles, born in upstate New York in 1950, has a storied career as an independent filmmaker, screenwriter, and writer of fiction and nonfiction. He has written and directed many films including Return of the Secaucus Seven, Lone Star, Passion Fish, The Secret of Roan Inish, and Matewan.  Writing scripts for others—he has a long list of credits as screenwriter—has generated the funds to support the production of most of his own films.

Sayles’ first novel, Pride of the Bimbos, was published in 1975 and was followed in 1977 by the novel Union Dues and a story collection, The Anarchist’s Collection, in 1979. Los Gusanos, his sweeping tale of Cuban expatriates in Miami, followed in 1991, and his most recent novel, A Moment in the Sun, was released this year by McSweeney’s and clocks in at 900+ pages. The novel is “a brutal picaresque complete with melancholy whores, militaristic robber barons, desperate cut-throat prospectors, and puppet soldiers…” according to William Vollmann, that looks at the United States discovering its own size and wealth and taking giant first steps at imperialism in the late 19th century.

Besides numerous awards and nominations for his film work and screenwriting including a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Writer’s Guild of America, literary recognition for Sayles has come in the form of an O. Henry Award for his first published story and nominations for both a National Book Award and the National Book Critics Award for the novel Union Dues. In 1985 he received a MacArthur Fellowship for his work in both film and writing.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Francisco Goldman. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

John Sayles, Reading, 18 January 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 18, 2012.

John Sayles, born in upstate New York in 1950, has a storied career as an independent filmmaker, screenwriter, and writer of fiction and nonfiction. He has written and directed many films including Return of the Secaucus Seven, Lone Star, Passion Fish, The Secret of Roan Inish, and Matewan.  Writing scripts for others—he has a long list of credits as screenwriter—has generated the funds to support the production of most of his own films.

Sayles’ first novel, Pride of the Bimbos, was published in 1975 and was followed in 1977 by the novel Union Dues and a story collection, The Anarchist’s Collection, in 1979. Los Gusanos, his sweeping tale of Cuban expatriates in Miami, followed in 1991, and his most recent novel, A Moment in the Sun, was released this year by McSweeney’s and clocks in at 900+ pages. The novel is “a brutal picaresque complete with melancholy whores, militaristic robber barons, desperate cut-throat prospectors, and puppet soldiers…” according to William Vollmann, that looks at the United States discovering its own size and wealth and taking giant first steps at imperialism in the late 19th century.

Besides numerous awards and nominations for his film work and screenwriting including a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Writer’s Guild of America, literary recognition for Sayles has come in the form of an O. Henry Award for his first published story and nominations for both a National Book Award and the National Book Critics Award for the novel Union Dues. In 1985 he received a MacArthur Fellowship for his work in both film and writing.

In this episode he is introduced by Francisco Goldman and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Norman Finkelstein with Chris Hedges, Conversation, 6 December 2011 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 6, 2011.

Norman Finkelstein received his doctorate in 1988 from the Department of Politics at Princeton University. For many years he taught political theory and has written and spoken publicly on the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Finkelstein is the author of six books that have been translated into more than 40 foreign editions: This Time We Went Too Far: Truth and Consequences of the Gaza Invasion; Beyond Chutzpah: On the Misuse of Anti-Semitism and the Abuse of History; The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering; Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict; A Nation on Trial: The Goldhagen Thesis and Historical Truth (with Ruth Bettina Birn); and The Rise and Fall of Palestine: A Personal Account of the Intifada Years. Finkelstein has also published several pamphlets, most recently, Goldstone Recants. He is currently working on a new book entitled Knowing Too Much: Why the American Jewish Love Affair with Israel is Coming to an End.

Finkelstein currently writes and lectures. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Chris Hedges. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to an audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Norman Finkelstein, Talk, 6 December 2011 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 6, 2011.

Norman Finkelstein received his doctorate in 1988 from the Department of Politics at Princeton University. For many years he taught political theory and has written and spoken publicly on the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Finkelstein is the author of six books that have been translated into more than 40 foreign editions: This Time We Went Too Far: Truth and Consequences of the Gaza Invasion; Beyond Chutzpah: On the Misuse of Anti-Semitism and the Abuse of History; The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering; Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict; A Nation on Trial: The Goldhagen Thesis and Historical Truth (with Ruth Bettina Birn); and The Rise and Fall of Palestine: A Personal Account of the Intifada Years. Finkelstein has also published several pamphlets, most recently, Goldstone Recants. He is currently working on a new book entitled Knowing Too Much: Why the American Jewish Love Affair with Israel is Coming to an End.

Finkelstein currently writes and lectures. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

In this episode he is introduced by Chris Hedges, then talks about his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to an audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts: