Tag Archives: racism

Rev. William Barber II, Talk, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II was introduced by Khury Petersen-Smith, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

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Rev. William Barber II, Conversation, 11 October 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Rev. William Barber II joined Khury Petersen-Smith in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Rev. William Barber II, 11 October 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 11, 2018.

Rev. William Barber II with Khury Petersen-Smith.

The Reverend William Barber, pastor at Greenleaf Christian Church and president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, led the Moral Mondays movement of weekly protests and civil disobedience against the discriminatory and conservative policies of North Carolina governor Pat McCrory, and against the celebrations of Confederate history that still plague the South.

Barber recently helped organize the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. Standing on the shoulders of the Poor People’s Campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, the program involved 40 days of direct action for racial, economic, gender, and environmental justice in 2018. Economic inequality in the United States has reached record levels. The actions of the federal government and local police officials have laid bare the legacy of racial terror and family separation that the country was built on. The Reverend Barber’s movement addresses the root causes of these interrelated issues.

Barber is the author of The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement (2016) and two other books. He also founded the organization Repairers of the Breach. His guiding principle is that “fusion coalitions rooted in moral dissent have power to transform our world from the grassroots up.” Cornel West says, “William Barber is the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr. in our midst.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Talk, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh was introduced by Jeremy Scahill, then talked about his work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, Conversation, 26 September 2018 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Nikhil Pal Singh joined Jeremy Scahill in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill, 26 September 2018 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 26, 2018.

Nikhil Pal Singh with Jeremy Scahill

Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—hot, vicious, global, and racial.”

Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, “Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.”

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this and other events there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris, Conversation, 8 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 8, 2015.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, writer, journalist, and educator is a senior editor for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is also a former writer for The Village Voice and a contributor to Time, O, and The New York Times Magazine. He has contributed to The New York Times and The Washington Post and has appeared on Democracy Now! and Moyers & Company.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michele Norris. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris, Talk, 8 April 2015 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 8, 2015.

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.
Ta-Nehisi Coates, writer, journalist, and educator is a senior editor for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is also a former writer for The Village Voice and a contributor to Time, O, and The New York Times Magazine. He has contributed to The New York Times and The Washington Post and has appeared on Democracy Now! and Moyers & Company.

In this episode he is introduced by Michele Norris and then gave a talk. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris, 8 April 2015 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 8, 2015.
Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris

This event was part of the In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom lecture series.

Ta-Nehisi Coates, writer, journalist, and educator is a senior editor for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is also a former writer for The Village Voice and a contributor to Time, O, and The New York Times Magazine. He has contributed to The New York Times and The Washington Post and has appeared on Democracy Now! and Moyers & Company.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: