Tag Archives: Readings and Conversations

Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus, 16 May 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 16 May, 2012.

Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus

Lydia Davis has been called “an American virtuoso of the short story form” (Salon.com) and “one of the quiet giants of American fiction” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). She has published seven collections including Sketches for a Life of Wassily (1981), Almost No Memory (2001), Samuel Johnson is Indignant (2002), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), and The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis (2009), as well as a novel, End of the Story. She was born in 1947 and after graduating from Barnard worked as a translator before turning to fiction. Ms. Davis is a celebrated translator of French literature including works by Jean-Paul Sartre, Flaubert, and Maurice Blanchot, as well as biographies of Marie Curie and Alexis de Tocqueville, with her most recent translation being a much-lauded Madam Bovary (2010).

Ms. Davis’ honors include being a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award for Varieties of Disturbances, a Whiting Award, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, a MacArthur Fellowship, and in 2005 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government for her fiction and translations. She lives in upstate New York.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, 18 April 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 18 April, 2012.

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website

Possibly Related Posts:

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 18 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2012.

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

W.S. Merwin with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 18 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 18, 2012.

W. S. Merwin, poet, translator, and environmental activist, has become one of the most widely read poets in America, with a career spanning five decades. The son of a Presbyterian minister, for whom he began writing hymns at the age of five, Merwin went to Europe as a young man and developed a love of languages that led to work as a literary translator. He currently holds the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

Merwin’s first book of poems, A Mask for Janus, was selected by W.H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1952. Numerous poetry collections have followed as well as books of essays. He is a notable translator of poetry and drama, primarily from the French and Spanish, and also the classics, with nearly twenty titles published including a much-praised translation of Dante’s Purgatorio, and more recently, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Over the years, his poetic voice has moved from the more formal and medieval to a more distinctly American voice. W. S. Merwin’s recent poetry is perhaps his most personal, arising from his deeply held anti-imperialist, pacifist, and environmentalist beliefs. In a career spanning five decades, he has published numerous books that explore the relationship between language and landscape, including The Folding Cliffs, The River Sound, and Flower & Hand. His most recent collections are Migration: Selected Poems 1951-2001 which won the National Book Award and The Shadow of Sirius which garnered him his second Pulitzer Prize.

Edward Hirsch has written, “Merwin is our strongest poet of silence and doubt, vacancy and absence, deprival and dispossession. He is a master of erasures and negations, a visionary of discomfort and reproof, the Samuel Beckett of postwar American poetry.”

His distinctly American voice has been acknowledged with many honors including two Pulitzer Prizes, the Tanning Prize, The Bollinger Prize, a Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award, the Ruth Lilly Prize for Poetry, and the PEN Translation Prize.

He lives in Haiku, Hawaii where, over 30 years, he has created a forest of over 800 species of palm that has been turned into a nature conservancy.

In this episode he is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Phyllis Bennis with David Barsamian, 10 April 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 10 April, 2012.

Phyllis Bennis with David Barsamian

Phyllis Bennis directs the New Internationalism Project at The Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. She is also a fellow of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam. She is a writer, analyst, and long-time activist on Middle East and UN issues. In 2001 she helped found and remains on the steering committee of the U.S. Campaign to End Israeli Occupation.

She works closely with the United for Peace and Justice anti-war coalition, co-chairs the UN-based International Coordinating Network on Palestine, and since 2002 has played an active role in the growing global peace movement. She continues to serve as an adviser to several top UN officials on Middle East and UN democratization issues.

Bennis is the author of Ending the U.S. War in Afghanistan: A Primer (2010), Understanding the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: A Primer (2007), and Understanding the U.S.-Iran Crisis: A Primer (2008). Bennis also publishes a bi-monthly newsletter on events in the Middle East.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

Phyllis Bennis with David Barsamian, Conversation, 10 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 10 April, 2012.

Phyllis Bennis directs the New Internationalism Project at The Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. She is also a fellow of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam. She is a writer, analyst, and long-time activist on Middle East and UN issues. In 2001 she helped found and remains on the steering committee of the U.S. Campaign to End Israeli Occupation.

She works closely with the United for Peace and Justice anti-war coalition, co-chairs the UN-based International Coordinating Network on Palestine, and since 2002 has played an active role in the growing global peace movement. She continues to serve as an adviser to several top UN officials on Middle East and UN democratization issues.

Bennis is the author of Ending the U.S. War in Afghanistan: A Primer (2010), Understanding the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: A Primer (2007), and Understanding the U.S.-Iran Crisis: A Primer (2008). Bennis also publishes a bi-monthly newsletter on events in the Middle East.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with David Barsamian. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Phyllis Bennis with David Barsamian, Talk, 10 April 2012 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 10 April, 2012.

Phyllis Bennis directs the New Internationalism Project at The Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. She is also a fellow of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam. She is a writer, analyst, and long-time activist on Middle East and UN issues. In 2001 she helped found and remains on the steering committee of the U.S. Campaign to End Israeli Occupation.

She works closely with the United for Peace and Justice anti-war coalition, co-chairs the UN-based International Coordinating Network on Palestine, and since 2002 has played an active role in the growing global peace movement. She continues to serve as an adviser to several top UN officials on Middle East and UN democratization issues.

Bennis is the author of Ending the U.S. War in Afghanistan: A Primer (2010), Understanding the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: A Primer (2007), and Understanding the U.S.-Iran Crisis: A Primer (2008). Bennis also publishes a bi-monthly newsletter on events in the Middle East.

In this episode she is introduced by David Barsamian and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, 28 March 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.” Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts: