Tag Archives: readings & conversations

Michelle Alexander with Liliana Segura, Talk, 12 September 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 12, 2012.

Michelle Alexander is a highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, and legal scholar. Her first book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, won the 42nd NAACP Image Award in 2011 for nonfiction and has been featured in national radio and television media outlets including The Bill Moyers Journal and The Tavis Smiley Show.

In this episode she is introduced by Liliana Segura and then talks. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

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Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus, 16 May 2012 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 16 May, 2012.

Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus

Lydia Davis has been called “an American virtuoso of the short story form” (Salon.com) and “one of the quiet giants of American fiction” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). She has published seven collections including Sketches for a Life of Wassily (1981), Almost No Memory (2001), Samuel Johnson is Indignant (2002), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), and The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis (2009), as well as a novel, End of the Story. She was born in 1947 and after graduating from Barnard worked as a translator before turning to fiction. Ms. Davis is a celebrated translator of French literature including works by Jean-Paul Sartre, Flaubert, and Maurice Blanchot, as well as biographies of Marie Curie and Alexis de Tocqueville, with her most recent translation being a much-lauded Madam Bovary (2010).

Ms. Davis’ honors include being a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award for Varieties of Disturbances, a Whiting Award, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, a MacArthur Fellowship, and in 2005 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government for her fiction and translations. She lives in upstate New York.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus, Conversation, 16 May 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 16, 2012.

Lydia Davis has been called “an American virtuoso of the short story form” (Salon.com) and “one of the quiet giants of American fiction” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). She has published seven collections including Sketches for a Life of Wassily (1981), Almost No Memory (2001), Samuel Johnson is Indignant (2002), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), and The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis (2009), as well as a novel, End of the Story. She was born in 1947 and after graduating from Barnard worked as a translator before turning to fiction. Ms. Davis is a celebrated translator of French literature including works by Jean-Paul Sartre, Flaubert, and Maurice Blanchot, as well as biographies of Marie Curie and Alexis de Tocqueville, with her most recent translation being a much-lauded Madam Bovary (2010).

Ms. Davis’ honors include being a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award for Varieties of Disturbances, a Whiting Award, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, a MacArthur Fellowship, and in 2005 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government for her fiction and translations. She lives in upstate New York.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Ben Marcus. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Lydia Davis with Ben Marcus, Reading, 16 May 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 16, 2012.

Lydia Davis has been called “an American virtuoso of the short story form” (Salon.com) and “one of the quiet giants of American fiction” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). She has published seven collections including Sketches for a Life of Wassily (1981), Almost No Memory (2001), Samuel Johnson is Indignant (2002), Varieties of Disturbance (2007), and The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis (2009), as well as a novel, End of the Story. She was born in 1947 and after graduating from Barnard worked as a translator before turning to fiction. Ms. Davis is a celebrated translator of French literature including works by Jean-Paul Sartre, Flaubert, and Maurice Blanchot, as well as biographies of Marie Curie and Alexis de Tocqueville, with her most recent translation being a much-lauded Madam Bovary (2010).

Ms. Davis’ honors include being a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award for Varieties of Disturbances, a Whiting Award, a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, a MacArthur Fellowship, and in 2005 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government for her fiction and translations. She lives in upstate New York.

In this episode she is introduced by Ben Marcus and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Conversation, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is joined in conversation with Michael Silverblatt. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

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Ann Beattie with Michael Silverblatt, Reading, 28 March 2012 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 28, 2012.

Ann Beattie is a short story writer and novelist who, after numerous earlier rejections from The New Yorker, had a story accepted by the magazine in 1974. Two more acceptances followed that year, five the next and regularly from then on to the extent that, as Judith Shulevitz says in the New York Times Book Review, Beattie “becomes so intimately associated with the magazine that people begin to talk of a New Yorker school of short fiction.”  Beattie’s most recent collection, The New Yorker Stories, is a compilation of those 48 stories published from 1974 through 1986 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of 2010.

Beattie was born in 1947 in Washington, D.C. and graduated from American University and the University of Connecticut. She is the Edgar Allan Poe Chair of the Department of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. Her first collection of stories, Distortions, and her critically acclaimed first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, were both published in 1976. Seven story collections have followed and seven novels, as well as a novella, Walks With Men (2010). Beattie’s next book, Mrs. Nixon, will be published in November 2011 and she says of it: “…(it) is a cross-genre book based on fact, but one that takes Mrs. Nixon’s life as a point of departure to present and analyze the way fiction writers write and think.” Beattie is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has received the Rea Award for the Short Story, a PEN/Malamud award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in Maine.

In this episode she is introduced by Michael Silverblatt and then reads from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Norman Finkelstein with Chris Hedges, Conversation, 6 December 2011 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 6, 2011.

Norman Finkelstein received his doctorate in 1988 from the Department of Politics at Princeton University. For many years he taught political theory and has written and spoken publicly on the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Finkelstein is the author of six books that have been translated into more than 40 foreign editions: This Time We Went Too Far: Truth and Consequences of the Gaza Invasion; Beyond Chutzpah: On the Misuse of Anti-Semitism and the Abuse of History; The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering; Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict; A Nation on Trial: The Goldhagen Thesis and Historical Truth (with Ruth Bettina Birn); and The Rise and Fall of Palestine: A Personal Account of the Intifada Years. Finkelstein has also published several pamphlets, most recently, Goldstone Recants. He is currently working on a new book entitled Knowing Too Much: Why the American Jewish Love Affair with Israel is Coming to an End.

Finkelstein currently writes and lectures. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Chris Hedges. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to an audio recording of this event there.

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Norman Finkelstein, Talk, 6 December 2011 – Video

Recorded at the James A. Little Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on December 6, 2011.

Norman Finkelstein received his doctorate in 1988 from the Department of Politics at Princeton University. For many years he taught political theory and has written and spoken publicly on the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Finkelstein is the author of six books that have been translated into more than 40 foreign editions: This Time We Went Too Far: Truth and Consequences of the Gaza Invasion; Beyond Chutzpah: On the Misuse of Anti-Semitism and the Abuse of History; The Holocaust Industry: Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish Suffering; Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict; A Nation on Trial: The Goldhagen Thesis and Historical Truth (with Ruth Bettina Birn); and The Rise and Fall of Palestine: A Personal Account of the Intifada Years. Finkelstein has also published several pamphlets, most recently, Goldstone Recants. He is currently working on a new book entitled Knowing Too Much: Why the American Jewish Love Affair with Israel is Coming to an End.

Finkelstein currently writes and lectures. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

In this episode he is introduced by Chris Hedges, then talks about his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to an audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie with Binyavanga Wainaina, 28 September 2011 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 13, 2011.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in conversation with Binyavanga Wainaina

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie burst onto the literary scene with her remarkable debut novel, Purple Hibiscus, hailed by critics as “one of the best novels to come out of Africa in years” (Baltimore Sun), with “prose as lush as the Nigerian landscape that it powerfully evokes” (The Boston Globe).

Her award-winning second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun, illuminates a seminal moment in African history: Biafra’s struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s.

“We do not usually associate wisdom with beginners, but here is a new writer endowed with the gift of ancient storytellers. She is fearless, or she would not have taken on the intimidating horror of Nigeria’s civil war. Adichie came almost fully made.” – Chinua Achebe

In her most recent book, That Thing Around Your Neck, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in 12 stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria in 1977 and grew up in the university town of Nsukka, where she briefly studied medicine and pharmacy. She then moved to the United States to attend college, graduating from Eastern Connecticut State and later earning Masters degrees in creative writing from Johns Hopkins and in African Studies from Yale University. Her fiction has appeared in Granta, The New Yorker, and The Iowa Review among other journals.

She divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website.

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Dinaw Mengestu with Penn Szittya, Conversation, 16 November 2011 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on November 16, 2011.

Dinaw Mengestu was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 1978. In 1980 he immigrated to the United States with his mother and sister, joining his father, who had fled the communist revolution in Ethiopia two years before. A graduate of Georgetown University and of Columbia University’s MFA program in fiction, Mengestu has written for many publications. He recently reported stories for Harper’s, The Wall Street Journal, and Jane magazine, where he profiled a young woman who was kidnapped and forced to become a soldier in the brutal war in Uganda, and for Rolling Stone on the tragedy in Darfur.

His first novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears (titled Children of the Revolution in Britain), won The Guardian First Book Award in the U.K. and the Prix Femina Étranger in France, and earned him a place as one of the U.S. National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35” for 2007. The novel has been translated into numerous other languages. He is also the recipient of a 2006 fellowship in fiction from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a Lannan Fiction Fellowship in 2007. Mengestu’s second novel, How to Read the Air, was released in October 2010 and earlier that year Mengestu was selected as one of The New Yorker’s “20 under 40” writers of 2010.

He lives with his wife and two young children in Paris.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Penn Szittya. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to audio recordings of this event there.

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