Tag Archives: slavery

Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner, Talk, 17 April 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 17, 2019.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.”

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ruth Wilson Gilmore was introduced by Rachel Kushner, then talked about her work. You can find the companion conversation here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner, Conversation, 17 April 2019 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 17, 2019.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.”

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, Ruth Wilson Gilmore joined Rachel Kushner in conversation. You can find the companion talk here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner, 17 April 2019 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 17, 2019.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.”

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also watch the videos of this event there. Photos from this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis, Talk, 26 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 26, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series.

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University and is the author of several books on Latin America, including A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War; Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism; and Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Grandin has published extensively on issues of revolution, popular memory, U.S.-Latin American relations, photography, genocide, truth commissions, human rights, disease, and political violence. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World.

In this episode he is introduced by Avi Lewis and then talks. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Greg Grandin with Avi Lewis, Conversation, 26 February 2014 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 26, 2014.

This event was part of the Lannan In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom series.

Greg Grandin is a professor of history at New York University and is the author of several books on Latin America, including A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War; Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism; and Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City. Grandin has published extensively on issues of revolution, popular memory, U.S.-Latin American relations, photography, genocide, truth commissions, human rights, disease, and political violence. His new book is The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World.

In this episode he is joined in conversation with Avi Lewis. The companion Talk episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts: