Tag Archives: writer

Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson, Conversation, 15 February 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 15, 2017.

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and coeditor of The New Fuck You/Adventures in Lesbian Reading. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.” Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014, was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.” Myles has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She contributes to a wide number of publications, including ArtForum, Bookforum, Parkett, and The Believer. Myles lives in New York and Marfa, Texas, and is a professor emeritus at the University of California–San Diego.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in Conversation with Dan Chiasson. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

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Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson, Reading, 15 February 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 15, 2017.

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and coeditor of The New Fuck You/Adventures in Lesbian Reading. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.” Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014, was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.” Myles has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She contributes to a wide number of publications, including ArtForum, Bookforum, Parkett, and The Believer. Myles lives in New York and Marfa, Texas, and is a professor emeritus at the University of California–San Diego.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by Dan Chiasson and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson, 15 February 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on February 15, 2017.

Eileen Myles with Dan Chiasson

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and coeditor of The New Fuck You/Adventures in Lesbian Reading. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.” Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014, was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.” Myles has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She contributes to a wide number of publications, including ArtForum, Bookforum, Parkett, and The Believer. Myles lives in New York and Marfa, Texas, and is a professor emeritus at the University of California–San Diego.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Possibly Related Posts:

China Miéville with Jord/ana Rosenberg, Conversation, 18 January 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 18, 2017.

China Miéville is a British American writer whose fiction has been compared to the work of Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, and Philip K. Dick. He is a three-time winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for The City & The City, Perdido Street Station, and Iron Council. He has won the World Fantasy Award and twice won the British Fantasy Award. National Public Radio describes him thus: “China Miéville is a magician. He’s the Keyser Soze of the New Weird because you never know who he’s going to be. He can do noir, do steampunk, do aliens, and magic caterpillars. He’s a shape-shifter.” Miéville earned a master’s degree and a PhD in international relations from the London School of Economics and held a Frank Knox Fellowship at Harvard University. His academic writings have appeared widely, and he has published numerous works of nonfiction, including Between Equal Rights: A Marxist Theory of International Law (2006), a book version of his PhD thesis. In 2015 he released the short story collection Three Moments of an Explosion, and the following year he published the novellas The Last Days of New Paris and This Census-Taker. He lives and works in London and is a founding editor of the journal Salvage.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, he is joined in conversation with Jord/ana Rosenberg. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

China Miéville with Jord/ana Rosenberg, Reading, 18 January 2017 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 18, 2017.

China Miéville is a British American writer whose fiction has been compared to the work of Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, and Philip K. Dick. He is a three-time winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for The City & The City, Perdido Street Station, and Iron Council. He has won the World Fantasy Award and twice won the British Fantasy Award. National Public Radio describes him thus: “China Miéville is a magician. He’s the Keyser Soze of the New Weird because you never know who he’s going to be. He can do noir, do steampunk, do aliens, and magic caterpillars. He’s a shape-shifter.” Miéville earned a master’s degree and a PhD in international relations from the London School of Economics and held a Frank Knox Fellowship at Harvard University. His academic writings have appeared widely, and he has published numerous works of nonfiction, including Between Equal Rights: A Marxist Theory of International Law (2006), a book version of his PhD thesis. In 2015 he released the short story collection Three Moments of an Explosion, and the following year he published the novellas The Last Days of New Paris and This Census-Taker. He lives and works in London and is a founding editor of the journal Salvage.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, he is introduced by Jord/ana Rosenberg and then read from his work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

China Miéville with Jord/ana Rosenberg, 18 January 2017 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on January 18, 2017.

China Miéville with Jord/ana Rosenberg

China Miéville is a British American writer whose fiction has been compared to the work of Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, and Philip K. Dick. He is a three-time winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for The City & The City, Perdido Street Station, and Iron Council. He has won the World Fantasy Award and twice won the British Fantasy Award. National Public Radio describes him thus: “China Miéville is a magician. He’s the Keyser Soze of the New Weird because you never know who he’s going to be. He can do noir, do steampunk, do aliens, and magic caterpillars. He’s a shape-shifter.” Miéville earned a master’s degree and a PhD in international relations from the London School of Economics and held a Frank Knox Fellowship at Harvard University. His academic writings have appeared widely, and he has published numerous works of nonfiction, including Between Equal Rights: A Marxist Theory of International Law (2006), a book version of his PhD thesis. In 2015 he released the short story collection Three Moments of an Explosion, and the following year he published the novellas The Last Days of New Paris and This Census-Taker. He lives and works in London and is a founding editor of the journal Salvage.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ru Freeman with John Freeman, 21 September 2016 – Audio

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 21, 2016.

Ru Freeman with John Freeman

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan-born writer and activist whose creative and political writing has appeared internationally. She is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editors’ Choice. On Sal Mal Lane takes place off a major road in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo, home to Sinhalese, Tamils, Burghers, and Muslims. Of their differences, Freeman writes, “To the untrained eye, the physical distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamil races was so subtle that only the natives could distinguish one from the other, pointing to the drape of a sari, the cheekbones on a face, the scent of hair oil to clarify. But distinctions there were, and the natural order of things would eventually come to pass: resentments would grow…” Both of Freeman’s novels have been translated into several languages, including Italian, French, Hebrew, and Chinese. In 2015 she edited the anthology Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine, bringing together the work of 65 writers and poets. She blogs for the Huffington Post on literature and politics, is a contributing member of the Asian American Literary Review editorial board, and has been a fellow with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. ​She is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for fiction and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman. Freeman was a Lannan Residency Fellow in the winter of 2016.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also view the video recordings of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ru Freeman with John Freeman, Conversation, 21 September 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 21, 2016.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan-born writer and activist whose creative and political writing has appeared internationally. She is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editors’ Choice. On Sal Mal Lane takes place off a major road in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo, home to Sinhalese, Tamils, Burghers, and Muslims. Of their differences, Freeman writes, “To the untrained eye, the physical distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamil races was so subtle that only the natives could distinguish one from the other, pointing to the drape of a sari, the cheekbones on a face, the scent of hair oil to clarify. But distinctions there were, and the natural order of things would eventually come to pass: resentments would grow…” Both of Freeman’s novels have been translated into several languages, including Italian, French, Hebrew, and Chinese. In 2015 she edited the anthology Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine, bringing together the work of 65 writers and poets. She blogs for the Huffington Post on literature and politics, is a contributing member of the Asian American Literary Review editorial board, and has been a fellow with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. ​She is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for fiction and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman. Freeman was a Lannan Residency Fellow in the winter of 2016.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is joined in conversation John Freeman. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

Possibly Related Posts:

Ru Freeman with John Freeman, Reading, 21 September 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 21, 2016.

Ru Freeman is a Sri Lankan-born writer and activist whose creative and political writing has appeared internationally. She is the author of the novels A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009) and On Sal Mal Lane (Graywolf, 2013), a New York Times Editors’ Choice. On Sal Mal Lane takes place off a major road in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo, home to Sinhalese, Tamils, Burghers, and Muslims. Of their differences, Freeman writes, “To the untrained eye, the physical distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamil races was so subtle that only the natives could distinguish one from the other, pointing to the drape of a sari, the cheekbones on a face, the scent of hair oil to clarify. But distinctions there were, and the natural order of things would eventually come to pass: resentments would grow…” Both of Freeman’s novels have been translated into several languages, including Italian, French, Hebrew, and Chinese. In 2015 she edited the anthology Extraordinary Rendition: (American) Writers on Palestine, bringing together the work of 65 writers and poets. She blogs for the Huffington Post on literature and politics, is a contributing member of the Asian American Literary Review editorial board, and has been a fellow with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. ​She is the 2014 winner of the Sister Mariella Gable Award for fiction and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for fiction by an American woman. Freeman was a Lannan Residency Fellow in the winter of 2016.

This was a Readings and Conversations event.

In this episode, she is introduced by John Freeman and then read from her work. The companion Conversation episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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Karl Ove Knausgaard with Zadie Smith, Conversation, 27 April 2016 – Video

Recorded at the Lensic Theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico on April 27, 2016.

Karl Ove Knausgaard is a Norwegian author whose books include A Time for Everything and Out of the World as well as his six volume, 3,600 page autobiographical novel, My Struggle. Dubbed “a Norwegian Marcel Proust,” Knausgaard begins his story in Book One almost ten years after his father has drunk himself to death. Reflecting on this time while embarking on a new novel, the author breaks down his own life story to its most elemental occurrences. Long passages reflecting on art, literature and music are interspersed with everyday details in the life of an ordinary Scandinavian.

Translated into English by Don Bartlett, Books Two through Five (with translation of Six forthcoming) continue Knausgaard’s epic, with deep introspection on love, family, friends, childhood and coming of age. Reflecting on the history of notions of life and death, Knausgaard asks: “What was man on this earth other than an insect among other insects, a life-form among other life-forms, which might just as well take the form of algae in a lake or fungi on the forest floor, roe in a fish’s stomach, rats in a nest or a cluster of mussels on a reef?”

This was a Lannan Literary event.

In this episode, he is joined in conversation with Zadie Smith. The companion Reading episode may be found here.

You may learn more about this event on the Lannan website; you may also listen to the audio recording of this event there.

Additional photos of this event are available on Flickr.

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